Embark on an adventure as we visit some of the most remote places on the planet on an exploration of the West Coast of Africa and the Atlantic Islands. Sail from Cape Town to Lisbon with stops in Walvis Bay, Bom Bom Island, Pointe Noire and enjoy overnights in Lomé and Tema. See beautiful lagoons, mountains, flamboyant wildlife and widescreen ocean vistas. Cruise on to the Bijagos Archipelago, Santiago Island, the Canary Islands and arrival in Lisbon.


Highlights


• Set sail from the picturesque Cape Town, South Africa, and embark on an adventurous voyage through a diverse range of African and European destinations.

• Explore the rugged beauty of Namibia with stops in Luderitz and Walvis Bay, offering a chance to witness stunning landscapes and perhaps encounter unique wildlife.

• Traverse the West African coast, from Angola to Ghana, and immerse yourself in the vibrant cultures, history, and natural beauty of this diverse region before concluding your journey in Lisbon, Portugal.


Sprawling across endless, staggeringly blue coastline, and watched over by the iconic plane of Table Mountain, Cape Town is without doubt one of the world’s most beautiful cities. A blend of spectacular mountain scenery, multiculturalism and relaxed ocean charm awaits in the Mother City, where you can venture out to rolling vineyards, dine in laid back sea suburbs, or spend days exploring cool urban culture. Cape Town’s natural splendour fully reveals itself as the cable car rears sharply to the top of Table Mountain. From the summit, 3,500 feet above sea level, you can let the scale of the panoramic vistas of the city rolling down towards the ocean wash over you. Another heavenly perspective waits at the top of Lion's Head’s tapering peak. A sharp hike and an early start is required, but the views of the morning sun painting Table Mountain honey-gold are some of Cape Town’s finest. Cape Town’s glorious sunshine and inviting blue rollers can be a little deceiving - these oceans are anything but warm at times, with nothing between the peninsula’s end and Antarctica’s icy chill. This cool water has upsides though, bringing a colony of adorably cute African penguins to Boulders Beach. Boarded walkways offer the perfect vantage point to see the cute creatures dipping into the sea and lounging in the sun. Nearby, journey to the end of Africa at the Cape of Good Hope, where you can stand at the bottom of this mighty continent, watching out over the merging waves of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Cape Town’s beauty is counterpointed by the ominous island form, which sits four miles offshore from the bustling restaurants and lazy seals of the lively V&A Waterfront. A living history lesson, you can sail in the ships that transported prisoners out to Robben Island, before a former prisoner tells of the traumas of life on this offshore prison. Your guide will show you the cramped cells, and render Mandela’s long walk to freedom in heartbreaking, visceral clarity.
Langebaan goes by many names, from the Ornithological Capital of South Africa, to the Jewel of the West Coast, so it’s no surprise that visitors and bird life alike flock here to revel in the intense natural beauty. The picturesque town luxuriates in a glutinous amount of sunshine, blooming with booms of colour during the brazen beauty of the region’s renowned flower season. Pristine white sand beaches roll out beside azure Langebaan Lagoon, where shallow waters simmer under plentiful sun, offering up a spa-like experience, in stark contrast to the icy currents of the open ocean. The lagoon’s vast mudflats and salt marshes, fed by the rise and fall of the tides, cultivate a unique and sheltered enclave of ecological diversity. Over 300 different species of bird drop in each year. The photogenic lagoon shelters colossal plumes of roosting seabirds, and elegant long-legged wetland species like Palearctic waders, sanderlings and little egrets among its many residents. The rise of the afternoon winds promises adrenaline-seekers a thrill, with kite surfers whipping into the air and kayakers digging their way across the surface. Langebaan’s shallow beaches and lagoons are never more spectacular than when gorgeous sunsets are spilling a deep-red haze over the landscape. West Coast National Park brushes up close to Langebaan, inviting you out on adventures during the park’s flower season, when it explodes with burnt-orange colours, as the daisies and wildflowers unfurl to enjoy long, sunny days.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
The scorched desert that surrounds Luderitz means the city’s collection of German art nouveau architecture couldn't look more unusually placed along the Namibian coastline. This quirkiness is what gives the destination its charm. See gangs of playful penguins skipping across the waves, pink flamingos wading by the coast, and dolphins leaping into the air near Penguin Island and Seal Island. A much more haunting location, with an incredibly dark past, is Shark Island - which witnessed the deaths of between 1,000 and 3,000 people when it was the location of a German concentration camp, between 1905 and 1907. Inland from Luderitz is Kolmanskop, the site of a famous diamond mine and ghost town.
Home to a beautiful lagoon, washed pale pink by a colony of resident flamingos, Walvis Bay is a colourful African call, where you can meet some of the continent’s most flamboyant wildlife. A small Namibian city on the Atlantic coast of southern Africa, the city takes its name from Whale Bay - which gives a clue as to the wonderful wildlife watching opportunities available here. The deep-water blossoms with rich levels of plankton, drawing curious marine mammals in large numbers to feast. As Namibia’s only deep-water harbour, Walvis Bay is an important fishing centre for the country, and its sunny shores and natural wonders make it a popular spot for holidaymakers. Walvis Bay is a bird lover's paradise, and hundreds of thousands of birds assemble here, to make the most of the tidal lagoon. Boat tours can take you out amongst the preening crowds, or you can admire the flamingos, herons and carefully treading wading bird species from afar. Meet the pelicans at nearby Pelican Point – a sandy spit, which calms the waves heading for the waterfront. With whales and dolphins frolicking offshore too, there’s a wide variety of wildlife to see here. On the cusp of the sun-scorched Namib Desert beyond, Dune 7 rises up to form the highest sand dune in the country, with sands piling up 380 metres. Perfect for a picnic, or a pulse-raising desert sport, like sand skiing or sandboarding. Climb to the top for views from its heights, or you can take a flight tour to see further afield and spot some of the extraordinary land animals who roam the landscapes. See the natural drama of Sandwich Harbour, where the golden sand dunes plummet directly into the ocean’s waves.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Perched between the edge of the expansive Namib Desert and the cold waters of the Benguela Current lies the coastal city of Moçâmedes. Formerly known as Namibe, the south western Angolan city recently changed its back to its original Portuguese name, after being known as Namibe, between 1985 and 2016. Both names are used equally. Like much of Angola, Namibe has Portuguese roots. The city was founded in the mid-19th century by 160 settlers coming from the motherland as well as refugees fleeting the unrest in Brazil. The impact of Portugal has left its legacy on the city. Roman Catholic and colonial architecture in the historic centre of Moçâmedes range from Saint Ferdinand Fort and the churches of Saint Adrian and Saint Peter. Due to Namibe’s proximity to the desert, it is unsurprising that the city briefly changed its name. Vast deserts and semi-desert regions cover much of the territory, joining the Skeleton Coast of Namibia. Desert vegetation is rife and includes the Welwitschia mirabilis, a rare plant found only in the Namibe Provence of South Angola and Namibia’s part of the Namib Desert. The plant, known colloquially as the “long-haired thing” is considered a living fossil, with experts believing that some specimens may be up to 5,000 years old, making Namibe’s examples the oldest living things on Earth. Namibe’s secrets are not just found in the desert however, the nearby (often dry) Arch Lagoon, or Lost Lagoon, is home to many bird species including water birds, raptors and weavers.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
A study in contrasting economies, Luanda is a boisterous coastal city of haves and have-nots. As capital of Africa’s second-largest oil-producing country, it has been deemed the world’s most expensive city, and since independence in 2002, everyone seems to be gunning for a piece of the post-civil war economy. Its renaissance offers a range of experiences, from cushy hotels to a restaurant-lined oceanfront promenade to locals hawking handmade goods at crowded public markets.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
If polished beach resorts with identikit sun loungers and beach menus are not quite your idea of experiential travel, then you have come to the right place. Because Lomé is authenticity at it very best. Tourists are few and far between, village life carries on much as it has for centuries and adventure, excitement and discovery are guaranteed. The capital of Togo, Lomé enjoys a heady status as the former “jewel of West Africa” (although both Ghana and the Ivory Coast claim ownership of the title). With over 40 tribes calling the tiny city home, whether it is the jewel of West Africa or not, it is certainly the most diverse melting pot of cultures to be found on the west coast. This patchwork of population is best experienced in the capital, where the dizzying sight of vendors strolling with huge bags balanced on their heads and motorbikes beeping and slaloming between the traffic is a tangible lesson in modern day history! A trip around the daily market will have you discovering not only a treasure trove of different tribal traditions but will also have you bargaining for anything from thirst quenching fresh fruit and beautifully made fabrics to livestock and voodoo spirit dolls. Voodoo ceremonies are still widely seen all over Togo, and visitors that are lucky enough to witness one will definitely take home a souvenir worth remembering. These are not just for tourists but an ancient, deep religious practice that merges African and Christian beliefs and is said to rid you of the devil within.
Ghana's fourth-largest city plays serene beaches against a bustling commercial centre. People from around the world visit the shore, both for its beauty and to enjoy the fresh seafood served right on the sands. Frantic city life awaits a short distance inland, where an economy fuelled by Ghana’s oil industry is most apparent in the maze of vendors at Market Circle. Takoradi is also the gateway to the UNESCO World Heritage sites of Elmina and Cape Coast Castle.
From a modest fishing port to the biggest in Ghana, Tema’s industrial activity has all but tarnished the charming, postcard scenery of the region. The neighbouring white-sanded beaches remain immaculate, still serving as a testimony of the rich variety of birds that can be found in the area.In the way Mother Nature intended it, gannets, boobies and kingfishers amongst other species fish in and around the cerulean waters of the coast. A light breeze tickles the inflamed, iron-filled soil of the mainland on which the railway linking Tema to Accra lures hundreds of visitors each day. On board one of the carriages to Accra, distinctively noticeable by their painted coats of red, yellow and green that echo Ghana’s national flag, a peek out of the window will offer scenic views of the harbour and coast, as well as the fields that separate Tema from the capital.
Ghana's fourth-largest city plays serene beaches against a bustling commercial centre. People from around the world visit the shore, both for its beauty and to enjoy the fresh seafood served right on the sands. Frantic city life awaits a short distance inland, where an economy fuelled by Ghana’s oil industry is most apparent in the maze of vendors at Market Circle. Takoradi is also the gateway to the UNESCO World Heritage sites of Elmina and Cape Coast Castle.
Located on Africa’s Ivory Coast, Abidjan lies amid canals and waterways. It’s a modern African city, affectionately known as Babi by locals, or, more optimistically, Paris of West Africa. This last moniker could be due to two things: one, Abidjan is both the economic and cultural capital of West Africa and two: it truly is a city of lights. It is also the most populous French speaking country in the continent, so welcome, bienvenue to Abidjan! Looking at Abidjan’s towering skyscrapers, you would be surprised to think that the sprawling city was originally a small fishing village. The French established a protectorate in Abidjan in 1842, and eventually colonised the region in 1893. Under French rule Abidjan quickly became a major port terminus, exporting mainly timber and coffee to Europe. Cote d’Ivoire was granted independence in 1960 but Abidjan remained the country’s capital until 1983. Today it considered one of the foremost African cities in terms of fashion, culture and the standard of living. Like much of West Africa, Abidjan has cachet and soul in buckets. The civil war of 2007-2007 may have left some pock marked remnants, but that should and must be easily overlooked. The city is bubbling with energy, enjoying a diversity of cultures from the aforementioned French connection to the steady stream of travellers that come to Abidjan looking for a destination with a bit of authenticity. If travelling outside of the city, the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Grand Bassam is less than an hour away.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
It may still be a bit of a rough diamond, but Sierra Leone’s capital is a true traveller’s gem. Lush rainforest and palm fringed beaches have been sadly overshadowed by Freetown’s turmoil, which has left its pock marked legacy on the city. Happily, this reputation is slowly receding. Expect to be greeted by warm welcomes and wide smiles. The city is slowly rebuilding after spats of fierce fighting in the 1990s. Today Freetown is a bustling metropolis, centred around the busy port. While there may be an undeniable element of poverty to the city, this is more than out balanced by the unfailingly optimistic vibrancy and intriguing history that Freetown offers. This joie de vivre makes Freetown one of West Africa’s most dynamic cities; think bustling streets and gentle sign-song sounds of local dialect Krio. British philanthropists founded the ‘Province of Freedom’, which later became Freetown in 1787. This was a British crown colony and the principal base for the suppression of the slave trade. By 1792, over 1,000 freed slaves from Nova Scotia had joined the original settlers, called the Maroons. Another group of slaves rebelled in Jamaica and travelled to Freetown in 1800. Unsurprisingly, colonial reign has left its mark on the architecture of the city. British involvement is best viewed at the National Museum, and in the superbly preserved Victorian railway. The uplands around Freetown are verdant and home to the Western Area Forest Reserve (accepted by UNESCO as a tentative World Heritage Site).
Tokeh, or Tokeh Town as it is also known, is a coastal resort town that relies mainly on fishing and tourism. Only twenty miles outside Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, this town is nestled in an area of beautiful scenery, surrounded by mountains, forests and beaches. The Tokeh Beach is considered one of the largest and most attractive beaches in West Arica. This town was first founded by a Sherbo fisherman who settled along the river bank. Much later, in 1968, a prominent barrister from Sierra Leone purchased the land, and in partnership with a French company, developed the village. Today, it is a thriving town with the resort, a church, mosque, community center, school and about 6000 residents.
Sacred, serene and secluded, the Bijagos Archipelago is one of the most intriguing island collections the world can offer. Almost falling off the map, the string of 88 lands form an archipelago of tropical beauty, scattered from the west of Guinea Bissau. The sprawling archipelago’s challenging location cocooned the islanders from much of the colonial interference for many years. So local traditions - of ancient ritual and colourful initiation ceremonies - have remained strong and safeguarded here. Thatch-roofed houses host welcoming locals, in villages where diminutive pygmy cows wander freely. Anthropologists note the islands for matriarchal elements in society, and priestesses play a significant role here, sermonising the islanders’ bonds with the natural world. Many of the islands are uninhabited, instead declared sacred and reserved for spirits. This has also helped form a protected paradise for some of Africa’s most exotic wildlife. UNESCO declared the archipelago a Biosphere Reserve in 1996 and its sprawling mangrove forests, undisturbed savannahs and muddy flats attract long-legged migrating birds, as well as beady-eyed crocodiles. West Africa’s largest saltwater hippo colony lurks in the waters of Orango National Park - see them smashing their way in and out of the water. Endangered sea turtles also faithfully return to the tranquil beaches each year, digging out over 25,000 nests. Extraordinary and authentic - an expedition to this enchanted, off-the-grid archipelago is one to cherish.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
The capital of the Cape Verde archipelago, Praia on Santiago Island might be in African in body, but it is European in soul. In fact, when the Portuguese colonised the islands in the 15th century they found no human inhabitants. Thus Cape Verdeans have evolved with a highly unique blend of European and African ancestry, conversing in a sing-song language of Creole, African dialect and Portuguese. The islands only gained independence in 1975 (after a 15-year war), so Portuguese influence is rife and to some, relatively recent. At almost 300 miles off the coast of mainland west Africa, the remoteness of the islands has allowed the archipelago’s natural wildlife to flourish. Naturalists consider Cape Verde as a mini Galapagos, with many endemic species. That, along with astounding landscapes, warm climate and clear waters is reason enough to visit. Add the liveliest market in all of the islands and you’ll soon fall in love with Praia’s shabby grandeur. Originally named Praia de Santa Maria when it was first settled in 1615, the city is nation’s capital. The city is built on a plateau near the beach Santa Maria beach, the town centre still has monuments that attest to its rich history. Due to Santiago’s location between Africa, the soon-to-be-discovered America and Europe, Praia became a slave central for merchants returning to Europe. Buildings built for the dubious trade are still visible – including those with balconies overlooking the square where owners would negotiate the price of human property.
Porto Novo is found on Sao Antonio, the northwesternmost of the Cape Verde Islands, and is the island’s largest town with approximately 17,400 inhabitants. Located on Sao Antonio’s southeastern and arid side, Porto Novo began as a fishing village and only in 2005 it was recognized as a city. Since the island has no airport and Porto Novo faces the town of Mindelo on the island of Sao Vicente, this harbor is the main link to the other islands in Cape Verde and the outside world. A monument above the port shows a woman waving goodbye to those emigrating from the Cape Verde Islands. Roads leading out of Porto Novo have to either go along the impressive northeast coast or cross the island’s mountains through a rugged and even more spectacular landscape. The third highest peak of the Cape Verde islands at 1,979 meters is the Tope de Coroa to the west of Porto Novo.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Watch the stars glittering at night, climb jungled volcano calderas, and explore the historical allure of this entry point to the sun-gorged island of Gran Canaria. The sprawling capital of the Canaries is Spain's ninth biggest city, stretched out along the sparkling coastline. Visitors and locals alike blow off steam on the city's urban beaches, before filling out bustling, authentic tapas bars. An offshore barrier of lava strips waves of their power, making Las Canteras's urban beach expanse one of the best and calmest in the Canaries. Strap on your snorkel to explore the seabed, which blooms with colourful fish and tropical reefs. Or, settle back to soak in the warm glow of one of the best climates in the world, while reclining on the soft sand, which arcs along the capital's fringe. At the other end of town, La Vegueta old town is a charming stroll along cobbled streets, wandering past decorative doorways and balconies that beg to be photographed. The narrow 15th-century streets take on an extra romantic air in the evenings, as lanterns cast a soft glow over them. Calle Colon offers a hint of the street's history - and it's here where the handsome colonial house - turned museum - of Christopher Columbus stands. Columbus stayed here to recuperate, between his boundary-redefining voyages. Out of Las Palmas, diverse and exciting volcanic landscapes await, including the spectacular Caldera de Bandama, which plunges 200 metres into the earth. From the summit, views stretch out to the looming island of Fuerteventura unravel. You can also discover pretty white-wash fishing villages, dazzling gardens, and the sun-bathed vineyards that produce Gran Canaria's crispest wines.
Unspoiled, green and lush, this UNESCO Biosphere Reserve has many secrets to reveal. A Canary Island capital like no other, life is lived at a refreshingly lackadaisical pace here. Wander between San Sebastian's faded pastel hues, which spill across the coastline, and bathe in this seaside city's warm sunshine, as waves splash onto sunny beaches. A sleepy capital city, travellers have been resting, relaxing and rejuvenating here for centuries – including Christopher Columbus, whose presence remains in museums dedicated to his visit. He called in to restock water supplies while voyaging to discover the new world. Silbo, an extraordinary whistling language, used to communicate over great distances, adds even more cultural fascination to this luscious island’s mountain scenery, crafts and traditions. Head to beaches like Playa de San Sebastian to revel in the black volcanic sand that the Canaries are known for, and Playa de la Cueva, where you can look across to Tenerife’s soaring cone. Or explore this island's own natural wonders, at the verdant terraced landscapes of La Gomera’s UNESCO World Heritage Site, Garajonay National Park. Trek through the trails of Laurisilva forests, laurel plants and heather trees. La Laguna Grande is another elegant location of colourful natural beauty, where island legends of witchcraft swirl. Discover ceramic traditions - handed down through generations - at El Cercado, where glazed jugs used to store chestnuts are moulded by hand. Squeeze more local charms into your bulging suitcase along San Sebastian’s pretty Calle Real street - where everything from palm honey to woven baskets and local snacks are up for grabs. Or settle into city squares, where life plays out in palm tree shade and café gatherings.
Nestled on the east coast of Lanzarote, Arrecife takes its name from the rocky reefs and outcrops that dominate its coastline. This pretty working city has a friendly, authentic feel, and has managed to remain true to its roots as a historic fishing village. There’s a lot to explore, and whether you want to lie back on long swathes of opulent golden sand, or strap on hiking boots to crunch across Lanzarote’s scorched volcanic scenery, this versatile capital has so much to offer. With castles, caves, sleepy beaches, and a glittering saltwater lagoon, Arrecife is the perfect place to get acquainted with the sun-kissed appeal of the Canary Islands. Lanzarote’s charcoal desert vistas radiate a remarkable luna-like quality, but dotted cacti, waving palms, and bursts of vibrant wildflowers add an accent of colour to the canvas. Arrecife itself boasts apricot-coloured beaches and labyrinthine lanes of white-wash buildings within its Old Quarter, where you can smell fresh fish grilling, and see locals dipping delicious local salty potatoes - papas arrugadas - into colourful sauces. An evening stroll along El Charco de san Gines is a must for watching fishing boats bobbing gently on the lagoon, and watching spectacular sunsets burning across the sky. Standing tall for more than four centuries, Castillo De San Gabriel is located on the tiny island of Islote de los Ingleses, and was once a target for pirates, who would appear menacingly on the Atlantic’s horison. The stalwart 16th-century fortress now serves as the History Museum of Arrecife, and exhibitions inside explore the evolution of the city, and the ancient culture of Lanzarote. The International Museum of Contemporary Art, meanwhile, displays modern and abstract works within the 18th-century San José Castle’s refined setting. See works from Cesar Manrique - the prominent artist and architect whose slick sixties style flair can be admired across the island.
Boasting an impressive 300 days of sun per year, there is a reason why Agadir is Morocco’s premier holiday resort. Nicknamed the “Miami of Morocco”, the resort has sea and sand in abundance, along with a dreamy 10 km beach – perfect for travellers who want sheltered swimming or enjoy water-based fun in the sun. By contrast to the rest of the country, Agadir is thoroughly modern. An earthquake destroyed the city in 1960, killing 15,00 in 13 seconds and leaving another 35,000 homeless. In its place, and under the direction of Le Corbusier, a new city with a new direction was built. Instead of souks and medinas, think modern architecture, wide, tree-lined avenues, open squares and pedestrian precincts. Low rise hotels, boutiques and apartment blocks line the splendid waterfont. While all the original landmarks were destroyed (many not once, but twice, in the 1960 earthquake but also in the 1755 Lisbon earthquake), Agadir strove to rebuild as much as it could. Thus the fabled 1540 Oufla Fort, originally built in the mid-16th century by Saadian Sultan Mohammed ech Cheikh was painstakingly recreated with as much authenticity as possible. The ancient kasbah sits at an amazing vantage point (Oufla being the Amazigh word for ‘above’). The inscription “God, King, Country” over the entrance in both Dutch and Arabic is one of the few original elements and dates back to the middle of the 18th century, when the kasbah was initially restored. The Kasbah offer by far the best views of the city.
Lying in a natural harbour to the west of Morocco, Safi (formerly Asafi) carries the weight of legend. As one of the oldest cities in Morocco, it is thought to have been founded by Hanno the Navigator in the 5th or 6th century BC. The etymology of the city’s name allegedly comes from a sailor who got lost and sighed as he passed Safi’s coastline (Safi meaning “oh my regret”). However, there could be another, more literal translation. In Berber, the word Asafi means to spill or flood, undoubtedly referring to the rich sea that makes Safi one of the biggest and safest seaports in the country. The city has been - and still is - a major player in Morocco’s trading industry. Its port has seen everything from gold in the 11th century to today’s principal export, sardines. Portuguese rule in the 1500s saw the Castelo do Mar be built, an imposing fortress that still presides over the city today. Under Portuguese rule, other Europeans came and by the mid-16th century, Safi was Morocco’s principal trading hub. This would all cease however under Sultan Mohammed ben Abdallah in the mid-18th century, who would order that all foreign trade must take place in his newly built city of Mogador (Essaouira). Famous for its pottery of all shapes and sizes, Safi is one destination where you will want to support the local economy. The potter’s quarter, just out of the city walls, boasts the country’s oldest kilns and is a mecca for all those who love both ceramics and tradition.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
A glorious mosaic of beauty, freedom and authenticity, Portugal’s capital is a stirring artwork of a city. Known for the seven hills it spreads across, and its stirring fado music, Lisbon is a pastel-coloured blend of houses and beautiful tile artworks - and this creative city strikes a perfect harmony between natural and manmade beauty. Stroll along Alfama's steep, cobbled streets as you explore one of the city’s oldest neighbourhoods - where each house and door could be its own photograph. Look for the decorative tiles, with the distinctive blues and whites of Azulejo ceramics, and visit the dedicated museum to learn more. Afterwards, wind up to São Jorge Castle, where views out across Lisbon’s red rooftops unravel. Just one of many majestic viewpoints, you can also seek out Miradouro da Graça for perhaps Lisbon's finest panorama, with the copper-coloured suspension bridge stretching over sparkling water beyond the sea of buildings. The elegant Tower of Belém rises in the Tagus estuary and is a historic defender of these shores. The grand, carved cloisters of Jerónimos Monastery spread out close by, and there's another UNESCO recognised location close by at Sintra, where a colourful town is set amid thick gardens and towering mountains - capped by the royal Pena Palace. Later, relax and take a quick break to drink Ginjinha, a cherry liqueur made from chocolate cups instead of coffee. Lisboetas have a sweet tooth, and the famous Pastel de Nata's crumbling pastry and caramelised-custard topping is the essential accompaniment to any coffee stop.
Itineraries are subject to change.

VISTA SUITE. From

$40,300 AUD pp
VISTA SUITE. From
Some Vista Suites accommodate three guests. 240 SQ. FT. / 22 M2 SUITE 738: 325 SQ. FT. / 30 M2 • Large picture window providing panoramic ocean views (Suites 421 to 447 only) • One French balcony providing panoramic ocean views (Suite 738 only) • Sitting area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed • Bathroom with walk-in shower • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe • Vanity table with hair dryer • Writing desk • Flat-screen HD TVs • Interactive Media Library • Unlimited Standard Wifi

CLASSIC VERANDA SUITE. From

$48,400 AUD pp
CLASSIC VERANDA SUITE. From
Some Veranda Suites accommodate three guests 295 SQ. FT. / 27 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (49 SQ. FT. / 4.5 M2) • Veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors • Sitting area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed • Bathroom with walk-in shower • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe • Vanity table with hair dryer • Writing desk • Flat-screen HD TVs • Interactive Media Library • Unlimited Standard Wifi

DELUXE VERANDA SUITE. From

$56,700 AUD pp
DELUXE VERANDA SUITE. From
The Deluxe Veranda Suite offers preferred central location with identical accommodation to a Classic Veranda Suite 295 SQ. FT. / 27 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (49 SQ. FT. / 4.5 M2) • Veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors • Sitting area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed • Bathroom with walk-in shower • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe • Vanity table with hair dryer • Writing desk • Flat-screen HD TVs • Interactive Media Library • Unlimited Standard Wifi

MEDALLION SUITE. From

$76,300 AUD pp
MEDALLION SUITE. From
Medallion Suites accommodate three guests SUITES 801-804: 441 SQ.FT./ 41 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (125 SQ. FT. / 12 M2) SUITES 741: 667 SQ. FT. / 62 M2 NO VERANDA SUITES 801-804: 441 SQ.FT./ 41 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (125 SQ. FT. / 12 M2) SUITES 741: 667 SQ. FT. / 62 M2 NO VERANDA

ROYAL SUITE. From

$209,300 AUD pp
ROYAL SUITE. From
Available as a one-bedroom configuration or as two-bedrooms by adjoining with a Classic Veranda Suite. 1 BEDROOM: 736 SQ. FT. / 69 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (126 SQ. FT. / 12 M2); 2 BEDROOM: 1,031 SQ. FT. / 96 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (175 SQ. FT. / 16.5 M2) • Large veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors; bedroom two has additional veranda • Living room (with convertible sofa to accommodate an additional guest); bedroom two has additional sitting area • Separate dining area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed; bedroom two has additional twin beds or queen-sized bed • Bathroom with whirpool bath and walk-in shower; bedroom two has additional bathroom with walk-in shower • Walk-in wardrobe(s) with personal safe • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer • Writing desk(s) • Flat-screen HD TVs • Interactive Media Library • Bose® sound system with bluetooth connectivity • Illy® espresso machine • Unlimited Premium Wifi

GRAND SUITE. From

$219,200 AUD pp
GRAND SUITE. From
Available as a one-bedroom configuration or as two-bedrooms by adjoining with a Classic Veranda Suite. 1 BEDROOM: 1,019 SQ. FT. / 95 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (145 SQ. FT. / 14 M2); 2 BEDROOM: 1,314 SQ. FT. / 122 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (194 SQ. FT. / 18.5 M2)• Two verandas with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors; bedroom two has additional veranda • Living room (with convertible sofa to accommodate an additional guest); bedroom two has additional sitting area • Separate dining area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed; bedroom two has additional twin beds or queen-sized bed • Bathroom with whirpool bath and walk-in shower; bedroom two has additional bathroom with walk-in shower • Walk-in wardrobe(s) with personal safe • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer • Writing desk(s) • Flat-screen HD TVs • Interactive Media Library • Bose® sound system with bluetooth connectivity • Illy® espresso machine • Unlimited Premium Wifi

OWNER’S SUITE. From

$227,900 AUD pp
OWNER’S SUITE. From
Available as a one-bedroom configuration or as two-bedrooms by adjoining with a Vista Suite 1 BEDROOM: 587 SQ. FT. / 55 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (89 SQ. FT. / 8 M2); 2 BEDROOM: 827 SQ. FT. / 77 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (89 SQ. FT. / 8 M2) Large veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors; bedroom two has additional large picture window • Living room (with convertible sofa to accommodate an additional guest) (Suite 734 only); bedroom two has additional sitting area • Separate dining area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed; bedroom two has additional twin beds or queen-sized bed • Bathroom with whirpool bath and walkin shower; bedroom two has additional bathroom with walk-in shower • Walk-in wardrobe(s) with personal safe • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer • Writing desk(s) • Flat-screen HD TVs • Interactive Media Library • Bose® sound system with bluetooth connectivity • Illy® espresso machine • Unlimited Premium Wifi

SILVER SUITE. From

Sold Out
 
Please contact Wild Earth for alternative options or to waitlist.

Vessel Type: Small Luxury Cruise Ship

Length: 156.7 metres

Passenger Capacity: 274

Built: 1995 / Refurbished: 2021

A major upgrade in December 2018 saw Silver Wind looking better than ever. A second refurbishment in summer 2021 will see her benefitting from a strengthened to ice-class hull and will make her one of the most adaptable ships in our fleet. Still timelessly elegant, still luxuriously relaxed, her improved cruising versatility means she is able to whizz from the Polar Regions at the ends of the earth to the iconic ports of the Mediterranean with fluid ease. So whether you want to get up close and personal to penguins in Antarctica or laze on the golden sands of the Caribbean, get ready for a wealth of diverse destination experiences, in traditional Silversea comfort.

Dining

The Grill. Soft breezes and ocean views beckon at the Grill, especially as the sun goes down when cruise guests gather for cocktails at the outdoor bar and talk about the day’s events.

La Terrazza. Authentic Italian recipes and the freshest, sustainable ingredients come together in this restaurant at sea.

The Restaurant. Enjoy Continental and regional specialities, as well as sweeping ocean views in our main dining room.

La Dame. La Dame features a menu of seasonally inspired dishes prepared with the freshest locally sourced ingredients.

Public Areas

Pool Deck. Chaise lounges arranged in the sun or shade. Bubbling whirlpools. The pool water refreshing in warmer climates, heated for cooler weather.

Reception. Be sure to visit the Reception area, where our experts can provide invaluable information to help you get the most out of your cruise.

Fitness Centre. The Fitness Centre offers world-class equipment, classes, and personalized services.

Connoisseur’s Corner. If you appreciate good cognac or premium cigars, be sure to visit the Connoisseur’s Corner to see the ship’s exceptional selection.

Boutique. There is a wealth of luxury shopping experiences aboard all Silversea ships, featuring the most distinctive and appealing brands from across the globe.

The Show Lounge. Applaud a broad spectrum of entertainment — from full-scale production shows and classical soloists, to cultural entertainment and feature films.

Panorama Lounge. Relax and unwind in the Panorama Lounge, a sophisticated yet amicable space offering beautiful ocean views as you enjoy your cruise.

Zagara Beauty Spa. Come and indulge in a luxurious spa treatment. Facials, body wraps, massages: the spa is the perfect place to unwind.

Dolce Vita. Dolce Vita is the gathering place for our savvy travellers of the world, a place where guests mingle and exchange stories and where new faces become lifelong friends.

Zagara Beauty Salon. Maintain your fresh look throughout your luxury cruise at the Zagara Beauty Salon. Services are available for men and women.

Observation Library. The Observation Library boasts exceptional views overlooking the ocean as it stretches out below you while you enjoy your cruise.

Photo Studio. The Photo Studio offers a professional space for budding photographers to retouch, print and display their work.

Cabin layout for Silver Wind

Optional tours and excursions available. Please contact us for more details.

Inclusions


• Voyage on board in selected cabin category
• Butler service in every suite
• All meals on board*
• Beverages on board (Select wines, spirits and non-alcoholic beverages)
• Crew Gratuities (Excluding Spa & salon staff)
• Expedition excursions
• Lectures and entertainment on board
• Free wif-fi (Subject to coverage)
• Laundry service included for certain fare categories
• Self service laundry facilities available
• In country flights where required by the itinerary

*Some onboard restaurants incur an additional cost
• PRIVATE EXECUTIVE TRANSFERS
• INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS - ECONOMY CLASS or Business Class upgrade at reduced rates
• AIRPORT TRANSFERS
• HOTEL

Exclusions


• International flights unless otherwise stated
• Passport and visa costs if applicable
• Travel insurance
• Optional shore excursions
• Spa and Salon Treatments
• Complete valet services, including laundry, pressing and dry cleaning, are available at an additional charge
Silver Wind
Atlantic Ocean Luxury ExpeditionLuxury Expedition
43 Days from
$938 AUD per day

or call us on

NZ Freephone
0800 945 3327

AUS Freephone
1800 107 715

to help you make your reservation

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