From French Polynesia to New Zealand via the Cook Islands and Fiji – what on earth could be more magical? This cruise ticks off some wanderlust whoppers: the idyllic turquoise waters of Tahiti, the colourfully authentic Chivas buses of Manta – home of the Panama hat and the gloriously undeveloped SavuSavu island in Fiji. Peppered with days at sea, this voyage balances discovery with recovery, prior to sailing proudly into New Zealand’s lovely Bay of Islands.


Highlights


• Tahiti & Bora Bora

• Raiatea & Rarotonga

• Cook Islands & Samoa

• Fiji & New Zealand

Papeete is the center of the tropical paradise of French Polynesia, where islands fringed with gorgeous beaches and turquoise ocean await to soothe the soul. This spirited city is the capital of French Polynesia, and serves as a superb base for onward exploration of Tahiti – an island of breathtaking landscapes and oceanic vistas. A wonderful lagoon of crisp, clear water begs to be snorkelled, stunning black beaches and blowholes pay tribute to the island's volcanic heritage, and lush green mountains beckon you inland on adventures, as you explore extraordinary Tahiti. Visit to relax and settle into the intoxicating rhythm of life in this Polynesian paradise.
If you have ever dreamt up your ideal island holiday, we suspect it goes something like this: Soapy blue seas? Check. Sparkling white beaches? Check. Thatched wooden huts, gently sloping palm trees and kaleidoscopic marine life? Check, check and check. And yet, even by ticking every box, first time viewing of Bora Bora still beggars belief. This tropical hideaway less than 12 m2 in the heart of the South Pacific has been toping travel wish lists for years. Long considered the realm of honeymooners – spectacularly romantic sunsets are a speciality – Bora Bora is not just for wandering with your love. If the prismatic shades of blue of the world’s most beautiful lagoon do not fill you up, then perhaps underwater scooters and aqua Safaris will charge your batteries. If exploring Bora Bora’s lush hinterland is more your glass of tequila sunrise, then trips around the island (often stopping off at the celebrity haunt Bloody Mary Restaurant & Bar) are a must. Bora Bora’s peaceful ambience has not always been the case. The island was a US supply base, known as “Operation Bobcat” during WWII. During this time, Bora Bora was home to nine ships, 20,000 tons of equipment and nearly 7,000 men. Eight massive 7-inch naval cannons were installed around the island, all but one of which is still in place. Although little is known of the history of the island, it is known that Bora Bora was called Vava’u in ancient times. This supports belief that the island was colonised by Tongans prior to French annex in 1888.
Known as the "Sacred Island," Raiatea is a fascinating haunt for archaeologists and historians as it's one of the islands in the Pacific where Polynesian culture can trace its roots. Visitors will find many of the older Polynesian structures still in place and are fascinating places to explore. In the 16th century, Raiatea developed a powerful cult dedicated to Oro the God of War and built a large meeting ground, the Taputaputea Marae, which is still intact. Human sacrifice was practiced until around the middle of the 18th century and visitors should look for the sacrificial stone. Several tour operators run visits to the marae (ancient temples) along with some degree of informed commentary—although in fairness Polynesian storytelling can embellish things a little. The Faaroa River is the only navigable waterway in French Polynesia and it can be traveled by powerboat or outrigger canoe. Running through the Faaroa Gorge it passes some spectacular scenery with steep-walled jungle foliage holding dozens of bird species and wild hibiscus. Trekking up Mount Temehani, a well-known landmark that's said to be Oro's birthplace, is relatively demanding. Keep a lookout for the rare, five-petal tiare apetahi. Said to be impossible to grow anywhere else, this white, indigenous flower can only be found above 1,300 feet (396 meters). Look, but don't touch. It's against the law to pick them.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Rarotonga is the essence of Polynesia with its warmth, vibrant tropical plants and some of the happiest and friendliest people on Earth. As the main island of the Cook Islands, Rarotonga supports most of the country’s people and services. The island was settled about 1500 years ago by traditional sailing canoes as part of the great Polynesian expansion. Cook Islanders are proud of their culture and happy to demonstrate their traditional skills. Mesmerising dances incorporate energetic posturing of warrior men and seductive gyrations of grass skirts on the hips of women, along with graceful hand movements. An ancient eroded volcano bedecked in rainforest dominates the island. Skirting the mountain is a flat coastal strip where most people live. The island is fringed by white coral sand beaches and a shallow coastal lagoon stretching to a protective outer ring of coral reefs. Rarotonga has many modern water and land activities for visitors, but without the tourism hype of more well-known Pacific islands. An easy escape from is to trek across the island’s interior past the Needle—an aptly named volcanic rock spire. The decaying volcano on Rarotonga produces fertile soil and captures rain, ensuring lush dark green vegetation. Bird life is headlined by the Cook Islands Fruit Dove, and the Kakerori (Rarotongan Flycatcher). Kakerori were critically endangered with only 29 birds in the Takitumu Conservation Area in 1989. A dedicated conservation program has enabled a recovery of over 500 birds.
When Lonely Planet co-founder describes somewhere as “the world’s most beautiful island” you can be sure that you are in for a treat. Incredible Aitutaki, inspiring Aitutaki, unbelievable, idyllic and unimaginable, there are simply not enough superlatives to describe quite how amazing Aitutaki is. Brought to light in 1779 by Captain Bligh, the Mutiny on the Bounty meant that Aitutaki has something of a bloodthirsty history. While Europeans missionaries eventually settled on the island in the 19th century (evidenced by the white, coral-encrusted walls of the many churches) the island’s Polynesian history dates to around 900AD. Traditional songs and dances from this period still exist (although Christian hymns, known as “imene metua” are also popular), and are performed by islanders with gusto and much pride. The island is part of the Cook Islands, one of the most secluded and romantic archipelagos in the world. With its powder white sand, warm turquoise waters and sense of casual luxury, it is easy to see why the island has earnt itself the moniker of honeymooner’s island. However, there is much more to Aitutaki than just fun in the sun. With a reef that completely encompasses a large turquoise lagoon, Aitutaki is considered one of the most spectacular diving and snorkelling destinations in the world. Added to the tropical excitement is that when entering the main village via Zodiac along a narrow channel – travellers will be greeted by a traditional and customary warrior challenge.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
The high, volcanic islands of American Samoa sit along the Pacific Ring of Fire; their cone-shaped mountains rise with abrupt steepness. These islands are stunningly green, the windward hillsides carpeted thickly with coconut palms, breadfruit and mango, while the leeward side is punctuated by steep cliffs. Pago Pago (pronounced Pahngo Pahngo), on the island of Tutuila, boasts one of the world's most beautiful natural harbors that thrusts as a fjordlike arm deep into the land. The harbor was formed when the seaward wall of a volcano collapsed, allowing the sea to rush in. The bay and encircling mountain peaks present spectacular evidence of nature's force and astounding beauty. Introduced to the world in 1722 by a Dutchman, these islands were then visited by English missionaries in 1831; the islanders took to Christianity with enthusiasm. In 1900, in spite of the Germans who controlled Western Samoa, the United States took possession and the U.S. Navy ran American Samoa until 1951. Since then it has been administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior as an Incorporated Territory and thus is a unique part of the United States. Its 50,000 residents are U.S. citizens with equal rights, except for voting in national elections. Pago Pago, along with Fagatogo, is called the Bay Area. It is here where Somerset Maugham's story in his famous novel Rain was set. The story, which was made into a movie with Joan Crawford, was so popular that a hotel was named for the heroine, Sadie Thompson. Today, the former hotel houses a restaurant. The lookout over the harbor and out to sea is stunning, and you can hike up to Mount Alava on what is now National Park Trail. On a clear day, the Manu'a Group and Western Samoa are visible. Back in Pago Pago just below Solo Hill is Maugaoalii, the hill of chiefs, where Government House is located; you may walk around the beautiful grounds or visit the courthouse past the village green. There are a number of good things to do here in the combined town of Pago Pago-Fagatogo; as the island is compressed, it won't take long to accomplish them at a leisurely pace. Pier Information The ship is scheduled to dock at Pago Pago Harbor. The town center is within walking distance. Taxis are generally available at the pier. Shopping Shopping is not particularly exciting in American Samoa. There are small Korean, Samoan and American stores that carry items residents need on a daily basis. A limited selection of handicrafts and Samoan T-shirts are also available. The local currency is the U.S. dollar. Cuisine Stone hearth baked foods such as breadfruit, pork, chicken and bananas are available in most villages, while more international fare is available at restaurants in Pago Pago. Other Sites Fono Building Home of the territory's legislature, its architecture combines traditional "fale" construction with modern materials. Naval Guns Hill Located a short distance from the Rainmaker Hotel and requiring a short hike, two guns remain as relics from World War II.
Planet Earth is divided into 24 different time zones and regardless of where you are on the planet, the time and date always changes at midnight. So, for those who travel westwards, time moves seemingly “slower” over the time zones gaining one hour per time zone crossed, but you suddenly find yourself one day older when crossing the date line from the Western to the Eastern Hemisphere since you have to adjust for the time “gained”! Just to confuse matters even further, the IDL (International Date Line) is arbitrary, and countries can request to move it as they please! For two hours of every day (between 10 am and 12 pm GMT), the world has three different dates, meaning that when it is 11.30 pm on Sunday in American Samoa (GMT-11), it will be 6.30 am on Monday in New York City (GMT-4) and 12.30 am on Tuesday in Kiritimati, Line Islands (GMT+14)!
As the first independent state of Polynesia, Samoa is considered the cradle of the nation, a place where the Earth and the heart fuse seamlessly fuse together. Incidentally, were one to translate the word “Samoa” into the traditional Polynesia dialect, they would find that the words “Sa” and “Moa” mean exactly that: earth and centre. Apia, Samoa’s only town, is found central north coast of Upolu, Samoa’s second largest island. Originally a tiny village of just over 300 inhabitants (c. 1800), the town’s population has grown to be just shy of 40,000. While a population of such size might mean forgetting traditional roots in favour of modern life, this has not been the case (too much) in Apria. The Samoan way of life is still very much the order of the day; traditional open-sided houses with thatched roofs on platforms of coral or concrete, also known as ‘fales’, can be seen everywhere and nearly all of the population (including the policemen) wear the typical local dress; skirts, or ‘lavalavas’ for men, and long, mumu-style dresses for women. The markets are bursting with culture and colour, selling everything from handicrafts to cuisine and local produce. If the idyllic setting of aquamarine pools of bluey green water, framed by low fringed palms and huge umbrella trees seems familiar, that’s because it probably is. The island, and notably the southern resort of Lefaga, was used in the 1953 Gary Cooper classic Return to Paradise Beach. It is also the last place on Earth to see each day’s sunset.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
An island paradise of rich colours and verdant scenery, Savusavu is a staggeringly beautiful, and gloriously undeveloped South Pacific island. Fiji's more tourist-orientated Viti Levu island is close by, but the joy of Savusavu comes in venturing off the beaten track and delving into the heart of a tropical idyll, where hidden villages welcome you with open arms. Revelling in its nickname as Fiji's hidden paradise, the country's second-largest island is a place of adventure - and geothermically fuelled relaxation. Mud baths burble and hot springs simmer across the island, adding to the sense that the land itself is alive and breathing. Trek the rainforests, with parrots chattering overhead, and see the colours splashed across the green landscapes and gardens by orchids and water lilies. Gardens overlook the gorgeous Savusavu Bay, and you can walk between hundreds of palm varieties and trees that droop, laden with exotic fruits. The sprawling rainforest opens up briefly to reveal Savusavu, the island’s compact main town. Thriving coral reeds add yet more colour and life to the surrounding seabeds, with spectacular snorkelling opportunities, and the chance to spot bottlenose and spinner dolphins skipping and skimming acrobatically across the tips of the waves. The fertile environment also encourages black lip pearl oysters to thrive here, leading to the development of one of the island’s treasured exports, beautiful black pearls. Visit the bay’s farm to find out more.
It doesn’t get much sweeter than arriving on the sun-soaked shores of the Sugar City. Fiji’s second-biggest settlement opens up a world of blissful beaches and turquoise seascapes, while its dense jungle lures the adventurous deep into its embrace. Step ashore where the first Fijians landed, and you'll understand instantly why they chose to make this island paradise their heavenly home. Experience rich Fijian life, and see dramatic displays like warrior dances, and remarkable local practices like firewalks, which kick up burning embers into the night's sky. Legend says the city took its name after two chiefs faced each other in a duel. A spear pierced one of the chiefs, leading to the shout of 'lau-toka!' or 'spear hit!' Sugar is Lautoka’s main trade, but its botanical gardens are a sweet insight into the tropical plant life that thrives here - from pearl white lilies to tall, fragrant orchids. Explore temples, charming cafes and mills - or barter for some of the juiciest mangoes you’ll ever taste at the city’s lively market. You'll only be able to resist the beaches for so long, and it doesn’t get much more stunning than the Blue Lagoon - a heavenly blend of woven together turquoise shades. Remote, wild and unspoiled, these are some of the best tropical beaches in the world. There's more rejuvenating relaxation at the mineral-rich mud pools and spas, fuelled by the volcanic activity below. Savala Island is a teardrop of sand offshore, and another beautiful place to wander with the soft powder between your toes - along sandy spits that peter out into the water. Or swim and snorkel among its envied reefs, thronging with fish life.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
The Tasman Sea on the west and the Pacific Ocean on the east meet at the top of North Island at Cape Reinga. No matter what route you take, you'll pass farms and forests, marvellous beaches, and great open spaces. The East Coast, up to the Bay of Islands, is Northland's most densely populated, often with refugees from bigger cities—looking for a more relaxed life—clustered around breathtaking beaches. The first decision on the drive north comes at the foot of the Brynderwyn Hills. Turning left will take you up the West Coast through areas once covered with forests and now used for either agricultural or horticulture. Driving over "the Brynderwyns," as they are known, takes you to Whangarei, the only city in Northland. If you're in the mood for a diversion, you can slip to the beautiful coastline and take in Waipu Cove, an area settled by Scots, and Laings Beach, where million-dollar homes sit next to small Kiwi beach houses. An hour's drive farther north is the Bay of Islands, known all over the world for its beauty. There you will find lush forests, splendid beaches, and shimmering harbors. The Treaty of Waitangi was signed here in 1840 between Māoriand the British Crown, establishing the basis for the modern New Zealand state. Every year on February 6, the extremely beautiful Waitangi Treaty Ground (the name means weeping waters) is the sight of a celebration of the treaty and protests by Māori unhappy with it. Continuing north on the East Coast, the agricultural backbone of the region is even more evident and a series of winding loop roads off the main highway will take you to beaches that are both beautiful and isolated where you can swim, dive, picnic, or just laze. . The West Coast is even less populated, and the coastline is rugged and windswept. In the Waipoua Forest, you will find some of New Zealand's oldest and largest kauri trees; the winding road will also take you past mangrove swamps. Crowning the region is the spiritually significant Cape Reinga, the headland at the top of the vast stretch of 90 Mile Beach, where it's believed Māori souls depart after death. Today Māori make up roughly a quarter of the area's population (compared with the national average of about 15%). The legendary Māori navigator Kupe was said to have landed on the shores of Hokianga Harbour, where the first arrivals made their home. Many different wi (tribes) lived throughout Northland, including Ngapuhi (the largest), Te Roroa, Ngati Wai, Ngati Kuri, Te Aupouri, Ngaitakoto, Ngati Kahu, and Te Rarawa. Many Māorihere can trace their ancestry to the earliest inhabitants
Blending beachy recreation with all the delights of a modern, diverse and thoroughly multicultural city, Auckland sits on the lucid blue-green waters of New Zealand’s north island. Known as the ‘City of Sails’, its two harbours will tempt you with waterfront walks, and the chance to breathe fresh sea air deep into your lungs while absorbing spectacular views of Auckland’s grand harbour bridge’s span. Take in the true scale of Auckland’s magnificent cityscape by ascending 192 metres to the Sky Tower, and looking out over the city’s gleaming silver towers, which reflect on the abundant waters below. Views over the bay and adjacent islands await, and you can share elegant cocktails at this dizzying height, above the mingling yachts of Viaduct Harbour. Immerse yourself in the rich history and culture of the area at Auckland Art Gallery, Toi o Tāmaki. Set beside tranquil fountains and handsomely landscaped flowerbeds of Albert Park, the French-Renaissance building houses New Zealand’s most extensive art collection, and exhibits works from Māori and Pacific artists. New Zealand is world-renowned for its captivating natural scenery, and day trips across the sparkling bays, to nearby islands like Waiheke, Tiritiri Matangi, and Rangitoto, are always tempting. Discover lava caves, grape-laden vineyards and flourishing wildlife in the Hauraki Gulf’s islands. You’ll also find an exceptional 360-degree panorama over the city, to the horizon beyond, from the heights of ancient Mount Eden. The spectacular dormant volcano rises improbably from a city suburb, and also lends its name to Eden Park – the unusual, translucent stadium of New Zealand’s mighty All Blacks.
Itineraries are subject to change.

VISTA SUITE. From

$14,900 USD pp
VISTA SUITE. From
287 SQ. FT. / 27 M2 Large picture window providing panoramic ocean views (Vista Suite) • Sitting area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed • Marble bathroom with double vanity, full-sized bath, separate shower • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe • Vanity table with hair dryer • Writing desk • Flat-screen television with Interactive Media Library • Unlimited Standard Wifi

CLASSIC VERANDA SUITE. From

$18,200 USD pp
CLASSIC VERANDA SUITE. From
Veranda Suites 605, 606, 640-645, 648, 649, 652, 653, 656 and 657 accommodate three guests. Deluxe Verandas offer preferred central location with identical accommodations to Classic and Superior Verandas. 345 SQ. FT. / 32 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (60 SQ. FT. / 6 M2) • Veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors • Sitting area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed • Marble bathroom with double vanity, full-sized bath, separate shower • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe • Vanity table with hair dryer • Writing desk • Flat-screen television with Interactive Media Library • Unlimited Standard Wifi

SUPERIOR VERANDA SUITE. From

$18,900 USD pp
SUPERIOR VERANDA SUITE. From
Veranda Suites 605, 606, 640-645, 648, 649, 652, 653, 656 and 657 accommodate three guests. Deluxe Verandas offer preferred central location with identical accommodations to Classic and Superior Verandas. 345 SQ. FT. / 32 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (60 SQ. FT. / 6 M2) • Veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors • Sitting area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed • Marble bathroom with double vanity, full-sized bath, separate shower • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe • Vanity table with hair dryer • Writing desk • Flat-screen television with Interactive Media Library • Unlimited Standard Wifi

DELUXE VERANDA SUITE. From

$19,600 USD pp
DELUXE VERANDA SUITE. From
Veranda Suites 605, 606, 640-645, 648, 649, 652, 653, 656 and 657 accommodate three guests. Deluxe Verandas offer preferred central location with identical accommodations to Classic and Superior Verandas. 345 SQ. FT. / 32 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (60 SQ. FT. / 6 M2) • Veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors • Sitting area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed • Marble bathroom with double vanity, full-sized bath, separate shower • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe • Vanity table with hair dryer • Writing desk • Flat-screen television with Interactive Media Library • Unlimited Standard Wifi

MEDALLION SUITE. From

$29,300 USD pp
MEDALLION SUITE. From
Medallion Suites accommodate three guests. 521 SQ. FT. / 49 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (81 SQ. FT. / 8 M2) Veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors • Living room with sitting and dining area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed • Marble bathroom with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized whirlpool bath • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe • Vanity table with hair dryer • Writing desk • Flat-screen television with Interactive Media Library • Bose® sound system with bluetooth connectivity • Illy® espresso machine • Unlimited Premium Wifi

SILVER SUITE. From

$31,000 USD pp
SILVER SUITE. From
Silver Suites accommodate three guests. 653–701 SQ. FT. / 61–65 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (110–123 SQ. FT. / 10–11 M2) • Veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors • Living room (with convertible sofa to accommodate an additional guest) • Sitting area • Separate dining area • Twin beds or queen-sized bed • Marble bathroom with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized whirlpool bath • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe • Vanity table with hair dryer • Writing desk • Flat-screen television(s) with Interactive Media Library • Bose® sound system with bluetooth connectivity • Illy® espresso machine • Unlimited Premium Wifi

ROYAL SUITE. From

$34,800 USD pp
ROYAL SUITE. From
Available as a one-bedroom configuration or as two-bedrooms (as illustrated) by adjoining with a Veranda Suite. ONE BEDROOM: 967–1,007 SQ. FT. / 90–94 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (110–116 SQ. FT. / 10–11 M2); TWO BEDROOM: 1,312–1,352 SQ. FT. / 122–126 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (170–176 SQ. FT. / 16–17 M2) • Large veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors; bedroom two has additional veranda • Living room with sitting area; bedroom two has additional sitting area • Separate dining area and bar • Twin beds or queen-sized bed; bedroom two has additional twin beds or queen-sized bed • Marble bathroom with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized whirlpool bath, plus a powder room; bedroom two has additional marble bathroom with full-sized bath • Walk-in wardrobe(s) with personal safe • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer • Writing desk(s) • Flat-screen television(s) with Interactive Media Library • Bose® sound system with bluetooth connectivity • Illy® espresso machine • Unlimited Premium Wifi

GRAND SUITE. From

$36,300 USD pp
GRAND SUITE. From
Available as a one-bedroom configuration or as two-bedrooms (as illustrated) by adjoining with a Veranda Suite. ONE BEDROOM: 941–1,090 SQ. FT. / 87–101 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (103–116 SQ. FT. / 10–11 M2); TWO BEDROOM: 1,286-1,435 SQ. FT. / 119–133 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (163–176 SQ. FT. / 16–17 M2) Large veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors; bedroom two has additional veranda • Living room with sitting area; bedroom two has additional sitting area • Separate dining area and bar • Twin beds or queen-sized bed; bedroom two has additional twin beds or queen-sized bed • Marble bathroom with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized whirlpool bath, plus a powder room; bedroom two has additional marble bathroom with full-sized bath • Walk-in wardrobe(s) with personal safe • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer • Writing desk(s) • Flat-screen television(s) with Interactive Media Library • Bose® sound system with bluetooth connectivity • Illy® espresso machine • Unlimited Premium Wifi

OWNER’S SUITE. From

$41,100 USD pp
OWNER’S SUITE. From
Available as a one-bedroom configuration or as two-bedrooms (as illustrated) by adjoining with a Vista Suite. ONE BEDROOM: 919 SQ. FT. / 85 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (220 SQ. FT. / 20 M2); TWO BEDROOM: 1,264 SQ. FT. / 117 M2 INCLUDING VERANDA (220 SQ. FT. / 20 M2) Large veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors; bedroom two has additional large picture window • Living room with sitting area; bedroom two has additional sitting area • Separate dining area and bar • Twin beds or queen-sized bed; bedroom two has additional twin beds or queen-sized bed • Marble bathroom with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized whirlpool bath, plus a powder room; bedroom two has additional marble bathroom with full-sized bath • Walk-in wardrobe(s) with personal safe • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer • Writing desk(s) • Flat-screen television(s) with Interactive Media Library • Bose® sound system with bluetooth connectivity • Illy® espresso machine • Unlimited Premium Wifi

Silver Whisper

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition

Length: 186 metres

Passenger Capacity: 388

Built / refurbished: 2001 / 2018

Our world-cruisers preferred ship, Silver Whisper sports a relaxing, sophisticated and genuinely elegant atmosphere. A multi-million dollar refit makes her one of the most technically up to the minute ships at sea.

The amenities of a grand resort. The charms of a stylish boutique hotel. Silversea’s Millennium Class ships Silver Whisper and sister ship Silver Shadow invite you to enjoy Silversea’s world-class accommodations, shipboard conviviality and warm, individualized service, paired with the enhanced spaces and amenities of a larger ship. Revel in the pampering treatments of an expanded wellness spa, shop the hottest trends from top designers at our shipboard boutiques, and enjoy dynamic full-scale productions in a multi-tiered show lounge. Silver Whisper luxury cruise ship has it all. Design your own schedule … or no schedule at all … Silver Whisper.

Despite her small size, Silver Whisper features four restaurants and many suite options. She emphasises the hallmarks of small ship passenger pampering, including fine dining and spaciousness throughout. View her deck plan here.

Cabin layout for Silver Whisper

Optional tours and excursions available. Please contact us for more details.

Inclusions


• Voyage on board in selected cabin category
• Butler service in every suite
• All meals on board*
• Beverages on board (Select wines, spirits and non-alcoholic beverages)
• Crew Gratuities (Excluding Spa & salon staff)
• Expedition excursions
• Lectures and entertainment on board
• Free wif-fi (Subject to coverage)
• Laundry service included for certain fare categories
• Self service laundry facilities available
• In country flights where required by the itinerary

*Some onboard restaurants incur an additional cost


Exclusions


• International flights unless otherwise stated
• Passport and visa costs if applicable
• Travel insurance
• Optional shore excursions
• Spa and Salon Treatments
• Complete valet services, including laundry, pressing and dry cleaning, are available at an additional charge
Silver Whisper
French Polynesia Luxury CruisesLuxury Cruises
17 Days from
$14,900 USD pp

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