Immerse yourself in the remarkable coastlines of Costa Rica and Panama. Costa Rica (‘rich coast’) is one of the most biodiverse regions on earth. Explore the lush jungle, tropical rainforest and inviting turquoise waters surrounded by a truly outstanding variety of wildlife, brilliant birds and flamboyant flora. In Panama, discover pristine coral reefs, meet the Emberá Mogue indigenous community and cross the historic Panama Canal.

Highlights


• Explore some of the most biodiverse rainforests on earth, a chance to encounter wildlife including sloths, howler, spider, capuchin and squirrel monkeys

• Enjoy a guaranteed daylight crossing of the Panama Canal

• Panama’s UNESCO-protected Coiba National Park offers superb marine and terrestrial wildlife viewing opportunities

• Hidden in the remote Darién National Park, you will be warmly welcomed by the indigenous people of the Emberá Mogue community

Upon your arrival at San José International Airport, use the complimentary airport transfer service provided by Double Tree Cariari by Hilton and transfer to the hotel. The hotel offers a free airport shuttle service departing every hour starting at 4.30 am until 10.30 pm. As you exit the international terminal, the pick-up point for the transfer is located in front of El Malinche restaurant. Upon check-in, please remind reception staff to provide you with your Aurora Expeditions cabin tags. Please fill out the luggage tags clearly, showing your name and cabin number so that we can deliver your luggage to your cabin ahead of your arrival. Enjoy the remainder of the day at leisure. Accommodation: Double Tree by Hilton Hotel Cariari (or similar)
After a leisurely buffet breakfast, transfer to Puerto Caldera (2-hours) where your vessel awaits. After boarding, you’ll have time to settle into your cabin before participating in important safety briefings. Afterwards, enjoy lunch on board as you sail to nearby Isla Tortuga (Turtle Island), where can snorkel, swim, paddle or relax. The water is teeming with a dizzying array of tropical fish, big pufferfish, turtles, sting rays, white tip reef sharks, and occasionally dolphins. Isla Tortuga we will do our kayak orientation and have our first introductory paddle. This evening, get to know your fellow expeditioners, expedition team and crew at a welcome dinner to celebrate the start of a thrilling adventure.
Curú National Wildlife Refuge is a privately owned and managed nature preserve offering visitors some of the best eco-tourism experiences in Costa Rica. The refuge is the first privately owned refuge in Costa Rica and is an example of a successful sustainable development program, offering over 3700 acres of tropical forests, mangrove swamps, and grassy fields sitting right along the coastline. 17 hiking trails wind through the varied terrain and you may see white-tail deer or catch a glimpse of armadillos or iguanas. Monkeys are prolific including the native capuchin, spider, and howler monkeys. Located on the southern Nicoya Peninsula of northwestern Costa Rica, the area is teeming with abundant wildlife and hosts one of the most beautiful beaches and protected bays on the Nicoya Peninsula, where we hope to go for a paddle and swim.
Boasting over 100 species of mammals, 184 species of birds and a plethora of diverse flora, Manuel Antonio National Park is a paradise for wildlife lovers. Costa Rica’s star attractions - two and three toed sloths, white-faced monkeys and toucans can all be found on hikes that weave through the park. Hiking trails snake their way through the parkland offering access to its rainforest, waterfalls and remote white sand beaches whilst from the water we can snorkel, kayak and paddleboard to view the exquisite coral. We anchor off the shores of Espadilla Beach and Zodiac to shore for a wet landing. Walk along this soft-sand beach or follow a trail through the rainforest parallel to the beach to get to Playa Manuel Antonio, which is the most popular beach inside the park. It’s a short, deep crescent of white sand backed by lush rainforest. There are numerous clearly-marked hiking trails to choose from - a circular loop trail (1.4 km/0.9 mi) around a high promontory bluff, which includes a visit to the highest point on this hike – Punta Catedral, which offers spectacular views, takes approximately 25 to 30 minutes return. The hiking trails in Manuel Antonio National Park offer excellent opportunities to spot monkeys, sometimes sloths, agoutis, armadillos and coatis.
Over the next two days, we explore the untamed Osa Peninsula, considered by National Geographic to be ‘one of the most biologically intense places on earth’. Considered to be the crown jewel of Costa Rica's park system, Corcovado National park is the country's largest and one of the most remote parks in Costa Rica. It is home to the largest and only tropical primary lowland rainforest in the world, provides habitat for a plethora of endangered plant and animal species including the scarlet macaw, various frogs, and the tapir - the largest terrestrial mammal in Central and South America. In order to conserve the integrity of the national park, restrictions are placed on the capacity of daily visitors permitted in the park. We therefore hike through a private conservation reserve adjoining the national park looking not only for wildlife, but also to experience the incredible wet tropical rainforest filled with tall trees measuring over 60 m /197 ft, lianas, epiphytes, palms, gingers and orchids. The following day, we will round the peninsula’ most southern point to enter Gulfo Dulce, or Sweet Gulf. The large bay hugs pristine beaches, rivers and tall evergreen forest, a protected area known as the Golfo Dulce Forest Reserve. As one of the wettest places on Earth with over 200 inches/5000 mm of rainfall a year, the Golfo Dulce Forest Reserve boasts some of the tallest ancient trees. Established in 1979, the Golfo Dulce Forest Reserve was created to protect the lowland forested areas that surround the gulf – the reserve also connecting other national parks in the area. We visit a private reserve called Casa Orquideas (Orchid House), akin to a botanical garden adjoining Piedras Blancas National Park. A hike in Casa Orquideas allows you to appreciate colourful orchids, heliconias, palms, and all the tropical wildlife such as toucans, macaws, tanagers, and honey creepers that feed from the flowers. The warm tropical waters in the gulf are a popular playground for dolphins - perfect for snorkelling, paddle-boarding, kayaking, and Zodiac cruising.
Leaving Costa Rica behind, we sail through the Panamanian islands of Coiba National Park, located off the southwest coast of Panama and inscribed as by UNESCO as a place of outstanding universal value. The national park protects Coiba Island, 38 smaller islands and the surrounding marine areas within the Gulf of Chiriqui. Protected from the cold winds and effects of El Niño, Coiba’s Pacific tropical moist forest maintains exceptionally high levels of endemism of mammals, birds and plants due to the ongoing evolution of new species. It is also the last refuge for a number of threatened animals such as the crested eagle. The property is an outstanding natural laboratory for scientific research and provides a key ecological link to the Tropical Eastern Pacific for the transit and survival of pelagic fish and marine mammals. Due to Coiba Island (the main island in the archipelago) previously serving as a penal colony, access to the island was heavily restricted. As a result, nearly 80 percent of the islands' natural resources have remained untouched and flourished because of limited human contact. Coiba National Park is managed by the National Authority for the Environment (ANAM) and is accessible only by permit from ANAM. With its designations as a National Park and UNESCO protection, Isla Coiba, its surrounding waters and island neighbours have been given a greater degree of protection. Despite being subject to poaching, illegal logging and other trespasses, the Panamanian government has taken a large step in their preservation. On Coiba Island, we plan to spend the morning at Granito de Oro islet, a unique place which offers the casual snorkeller a diversity and volume of marine life that many avid scuba divers spend their lives trying to see. The waters surrounding are considered one of the best diving destinations in the world. Enjoy the morning snorkelling among abundant marine life, kayaking around rocky outcroppings, and basking on the warm sand. At Granito de Oro you can also enjoy hiking the “Monkey Trail”. The forest here is home to rare indigenous flora, and provides sanctuary for wildlife such as mantled howler monkeys and crested eagles, as well as threatened bird species such as the crested eagle.
From 1919 to 2004, the penal colony on Coiba Islands was home to Panama’s most dangerous criminals and political prisoners. At the peak of its operations, the prison housed up to approximately 3,000 inmates in about 30 camps spread around the islands. We spend the morning on the hiking trails that lead to a number of waterfalls, hot springs. Remains of the prison, now roofless and rusted, can still be found at Damas Bay on the eastern side of the island. Back on board, enjoy lunch as we set towards the Pearl Islands.
The Pearl Islands of Panama is an archipelago located in the North Pacific Ocean in the Gulf of Panama, covering around 250 small islands. The Spanish Conquistadors discovered the islands in 1503 and gave the Islands its name due to the great amounts of pearls found on them. The Pearl Islands were originally named by the Spanish explorer Vasco Nuñez de Balboa due to the bountiful pearls that were harvested off the islands’ shores. The Pearl Islands are most famous for their spectacular and tranquil white sand beaches, untouched forests, and colourful coral reefs offshore – ideal for diving, snorkelling and kayaking. The largest of the islands is Isla Del Rey but Isla Contadora is the only destination in the archipelago that is equipped with enough infrastructure to attract a large number of visitors. In addition to Isla Contadora, we plan to visit a few nearby islands including Bartolome to enjoy some aquatic activities before exploring Pachequilla, and Pacheca island, also known as Isla de Los Párajos (Bird Island) because it hosts several colonies of seabirds.
There are few places on Earth like the Darién - a region of great interest to biologists, anthropologists, and a notorious route for smuggling narcotics. It is a place of immense natural beauty, where life in the rainforest has remained relatively unchanged for the indigenous communities that live there. It is Panama’s last frontier. The Darién is enormous. The province itself spans some 16,671 square kilometres (6,437 square miles) and contains Panama’s largest national park and most the country’s most extensive lowland tropical forest. However, with only 40,000 inhabitants, the Darién is also the most sparsely populated part of Panama. Its residents live in small, impoverished towns, and include members of the Guna and Emberà-Wounaan indigenous groups. For many, the Darién is little more than the place where the Pan-American Highway ends and the Darién Gap begins. The gap is the only missing link in a system of roads that connects North and South America, all the way from Alaska to Patagonia. Darién National Park, which spans a total of 579,000 hectares (1,430,740 acres), is the largest national park in Central America. Rarely visited, the region is characterized by unspoiled sandy beaches, jagged rocky coasts, mangrove swamps, and tropical forests bursting with endemic and rare species of plants and birds such as the scarlet macaw, toucan and harpy eagle. Mammals include ocelot, jaguar, Baird’s tapir, anteater, sloth, coatis and kinkajou, In an effort to save the Darién from being poached by loggers and developers, UNESCO inscribed the Darien National Park into its list of World Heritage Sites in 1983. You will visit Mogue, an Emberá community in the Darién, a remote destination where you will be rewarded with a unique look at a traditional Emberá village. The village is accessible after a 30-minute Zodiac ride (during high tide) up the scenic and swampy Mogue River surrounded by rainforest. You may see birds such as willets, whimbrels, and laughing falcons. Nearing the village, we will be warmly welcomed by the community leaders who will meet our Zodiacs and personally transfer us to their village using their traditional boats. On arrival, the village is a 15-minute walk from the shore of the river. Mogue was established by the indigenous Emberá in the 1960s and tourism plays a substantial role in sustaining its existence. Upon arriving at the village, the Emberá women will perform a traditional blessing dances to welcome us followed by a more formal welcome by the main ‘Nocoe’ (chief). It is customary for the Emberá to share food and fruits of the season with visitors. Local artisans are proud to show you their handicraft skills such as woodcarving, mask-making, weaving and jewelry-making – all available for purchase, and a wonderful way to directly support the community. On guided hikes, you might be able to spot a harpy eagle or crested eagle—the nests of both birds have been spotted here in the past.
Three million years ago, the Isthmus of Panama emerged from the sea and changed the world forever. It divided an ocean and joined two continents together, triggering one of the most important natural evolution events in the history of the world. Today, this narrow land bridge in Central America is home to more species of birds and trees than the whole of North America. Panama is of course world-famous for its 77 km / 48 mi canal that connects the Pacific Ocean with the Atlantic Ocean. Panama’s history has been formed by a rich pre-Columbian era for more than 12,000 years. Early cultures in Panama were the Monagrillo, the Cueva and the Conte, particularly famous for their pottery, which was the first in the Americas. The first European claiming the territory of today’s Panama was Rodrigo de Bastidas, coming from Colombia’s Atlantic coast in 1501. In 1513 Vasco Nuñez de Balboa became the first Spaniard to see the Pacific Ocean from the top of a hill. Four days later he and his men stood at the shores of the Pacific Ocean. In 1519 Panama City was founded, and became an important hub for seized goods making its way from Peru to Spain. In 1671, English buccaneer Henry Morgan looted and completely destroyed Panama City. These ruins of Old Panama (Panama la Vieja) are open to visitors. In the same decade, a new city and what’s today known as Casco Viejo was constructed 10 km / 6.2 mi away from Panama la Vieja. Shore Excursions (please choose one of the following) Miraflores Visitor Centre and Colonial City Tour at “Casco Viejo” At the Miraflores Visitor Centre, you will find different activities to learn and fully enjoy the Panama Canal. In the cinema, watch a short 10-minute film on the history of the Panama Canal from its beginnings to the present. Four exhibition halls portray the Canal's history and biodiversity, while three terraces and observation decks are ideal places for observing the Canal's operation, the passage of ships through the locks and how they move. Inscribed on the list of World Heritage Sites in 1997, Panama City’s Casco Viejo (Old Quarter) is a compact treasure trove of 16th and 17th century colonial architecture. The oldest continuously occupied European city in the Americas on the Pacific coast, Panama Viejo as it is now known was founded in 1519. The excursion includes visits to two exceptional sites as well as a guided walk around the historic quarter and the cobblestone streets for a leisurely look at many historic landmarks including: Plaza Herrera, San José Church, Plaza Francia, Plaza Bolívar with the San Francisco de Asis Church, Plaza Mayor (where the Metropolitan Cathedral is located). After the tour, you have the option of exploring Casco Viejo at your own pace or return to the ship. A shuttle service will be available to transfer you back to the ship if you even if you extend your time in the old town. Gatun Lake Expedition & Walking Tour at “Casco Viejo” Gatun Lake is a large artificial lake with a unique ecosystem that forms a major part of the Panama Canal, carrying ships for 33 km (20 miles) on their transit across the Isthmus of Panama. At the time it was created, Gatun Lake was the largest man-made lake in the world. The vegetation at Gatun Lake offers ideal habitats for a large number of bird species. The excursion starts with boat trip heading north on the Canal for 25 minutes where we may get close to some of the larger ships that transit the canal daily. Enjoy a slow cruise along the forested banks of Gatun Lake, a protected area, looking for wildlife such as Capuchin Monkeys, three-toed sloth, howler monkeys, various kinds of toucans and other bird life. This is a place to observe the raw regenerative power of the forest as it struggles to claim what was once wild. Enjoy lunch at a resort located in the shores of the Gatun Lake. Afterwards, head to Casco Viejo, Panama’s historic colonial centre listed as a UNESCO world heritage site filled with delightful colonial houses, narrow cobblestone streets and impressive churches. In the “Casco Antiguo” lies French Park, a monument to the French builders who started the Panama Canal. Some superb museums are found in the Old Quarter, including the Canal Museum, which traces Panama's history. Transfer back to the ship or explore Casco Viejo at your own pace. A scheduled shuttle service will transfer you back to the ship.
Crossing the Panama Canal will surely be a highlight for many travellers. Each year, over a million people visit the canal to witness this engineering marvel at work. Starting in the Pacific Ocean, you will be able to admire the Bay of Panama and Panama City’s splendorous skyline before passing under the ‘Bridge of the Americas’. The vessel will then transit through the first set of locks, the Miraflores Locks, where it will be lifted 16 metres in two distinct steps. Next, your ship will enter Miraflores Lake, which is a small artificial body of fresh water that separates Pedro Miguel Locks from Miraflores Locks. The vessel will transit through Pedro Miguel Locks, which is one of the two sets of locks on the Pacific side, and here the vessel is lifted 9 metres in one step. After exiting Pedro Miguel locks, your boat will travel through the Gaillard Cut, where the Chagres River flows into the canal. The Gaillard Cut (also known as Culebra Cut because its curves resemble a snake) is one of the main points of interest for visitors because it was carved through the Continental Divide and this section of the canal is full of history and geological value. As you transit the cut you will see dredging occurring to control the sediments entering the canal because of the terrain’s susceptibility to landslides. Sail through Gatun Lake, which was formed by erecting the Gatun Dam across the Chagres River, and during your transit through the lake, you will pass the Smithsonian Research Station at Barro Colorado. The last of the three locks in the Gatun Locks, the only set of locks in the Atlantic sector. At Gatun Locks, the vessel will be lowered a total of 26 metres in three distinct chambers. The complete crossing from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean takes approximately 10 hours, a journey that once took almost two weeks to complete, where vessels were forced to sail around the notoriously rough seas around Cape Horn at the bottom of South America to reach the Pacific coast.
Sail to Cartagena de Indias, Colombia. While at sea, enjoy a few final presentations from our team of experts. Edit photos, finish the book you’ve been enjoying, or simply relax on your private balcony or in one of the many public spaces on board the ship.
Disembark in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, inscribed by UNESCO as a site of Outstanding Universal Heritage. The city’s rich history, diverse culture and energy captivates visitors with its vibrancy, Afro-Caribbean character, indigenous influences and some of the best-preserved colonial architecture in all of South America. Founded in 1533 by Pedro de Heredia, Cartagena was formerly one of the gateways to the Caribbean for the Spanish. It was here they would store the riches plundered from South America before they were transported back to the old world. It is not surprising therefore that the city drew the attention of buccaneers and pirates who attempted, on many occasions, to seize the city, most notably by Sir Francis Drake who in 1586, "mercifully" agreed not to destroy the city in return for 10 million pesos. It was after the attack by Drake that plans were made to fortify the city and work on the defensive fort walls began. These walls, still stand today, and mark the boundary between the old and new parts of the city. The walls and fort, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, took a total of 200 years to build and complete, and the Spanish finished them just 25 years before Colombia gained Independence. Today’s introductory tour will take you through Cartagena’s old town under the Puerta Del Reloj (Clock tower entrance) into the Plaza de los Coches. Your expert local guide will tell stories of the myths and legends, histories and stories of Cartagena from ancient times right up to the present. From the Plaza San Pedro Claver with its stunning Church, to the Plaza Bolivar with its shady areas, where you can watch the world go by. During the walk you will visit the Inquisition Palace, built in the 17th century, and considered one of the most elegant and characteristic colonial constructions in its time. A short walk away and your final stop is a visit to San Pedro Claver Cloister, monastery and museum built in homage to San Pedro - the protector of slaves. The cloister where Pedro Claver lived and died has become a special place of silence, and reflection – a shrine to his life's work. Here, visitors will find examples of pre-Colombian ceramics and a museum filled with religious art. Adjoining the monastery is a baroque church designed by German and Dutch architects, where the remains of Saint Pedro Claver is enshrined. The tour ends with a transfer to our group hotel. After check-in, enjoy the remainder of the day at leisure. (Breakfast included. Lunch and dinner at own expense) Accommodation: Hyatt Regency (or similar)
After breakfast, farewell your fellow travellers and check-out of your room before making your own way to the airport for your onward journey.
Due to strict regulations enforced by local environmental authorities to conserve and protect the pristine places visited on this voyage, permits can be cancelled by authorities at any time with very little notice. Under such circumstances, Aurora Expeditions reserves the right to change our itineraries with little or no prior notice.

Aurora Stateroom Triple

$14,295 AUD pp
Aurora Stateroom Triple
Private Bathroom. There are six Aurora Stateroom Triple cabins featuring portholes, all with private en-suites. Located on Deck 3, they're close to the mudroom and loading platforms. *Please note the Aurora Stateroom Triple cabins are only available on certain departures

Aurora Stateroom Twin

$14,695 AUD pp
Aurora Stateroom Twin
Private Bathroom. The Greg Mortimer features eight Aurora Stateroom Twin cabins featuring portholes, all with private en-suites. Located on Deck 3, they're close to the mudroom and loading platforms, perfect for adventurers who are looking for a comfortable base that's close to the action.

Balcony Stateroom - C

$15,995 AUD pp
Balcony Stateroom - C
Private Bathroom Cabin & balcony combined size: 20.9m2 - 24.8m2 We have three cabin categories of our Balcony Staterooms. These are classified as A, B or C depending on the cabin size. Our 14 Balcony Stateroom – C cabins are our most economical, fitted with all the necessities and comfortable for up to 2 people. These cabins are scattered throughout Deck 4 and 6.

Balcony Stateroom - B

$16,795 AUD pp
Balcony Stateroom - B
Private Bathroom Cabin & balcony combined size: 23.6m2 - 24.8 m2 We have three cabin categories of our Balcony Staterooms. These are classified as A, B or C depending on the cabin size. Our 21 Balcony Stateroom – B Cabins are our standard cabin, many fitted with interconnecting features making them great for families or groups. These cabins are located at the fore and aft of Deck 4 and 6.

Balcony Stateroom - A

$18,095 AUD pp
Balcony Stateroom - A
Private Bathroom Cabin & balcony combined size: 24.1m2 - 31.3m2 We have three cabin categories of our Balcony Staterooms. These are classified as A, B or C depending on the cabin size. Our 23 Balcony Stateroom – A cabins are our premium cabin, and the most abundant on board. These cabins are located in preferred positions on Deck 4 and 6 which provides easy access between Decks via the internal stairs or elevator.

Balcony Stateroom Superior

$19,795 AUD pp
Balcony Stateroom Superior
Private Bathroom With a bit more room to stretch the legs, the Greg Mortimer's two Balcony Suites are perfect for polar adventurers who travel with plenty of gear. Located on Deck 4, the Balcony Suites feature private balconies, floor to ceiling windows, en-suite bathrooms and a comfortable desk area. These will sell out quickly!

Junior Suite

$24,795 AUD pp
Junior Suite
Private Bathroom The Greg Mortimer's four Junior Suites take in some impressive scenery from their vantage points on Deck 7. When you aren't enjoying a landing, you can relax in the suites' separate lounge area, or just watch the world float by from the private balcony.

Captain's Suite

$29,395 AUD pp
Captain's Suite
Private Bathroom The largest of all our rooms, the Greg Mortimer's singular Captain's Suite will take you to the polar regions in ultimate style and comfort. Complete with large lounge area, balcony, walk-in wardrobe and en-suite, you'll need to get in early to secure this suite.

Greg Mortimer

Vessel Type: Expedition

Length: 104 metres

Passenger Capacity: 132

Built: 2019

Capable of negotiating the strongest winds and waves, the Greg Mortimer is built to world-class polar standards – designed in close consultation with our expedition specialists, taking advantage of our more than 25 years of experience.

The Greg Mortimer redefines expedition cruising for the future, with just 132 passengers on board in the polar regions. Not only is the ship bigger to contend with adverse weather conditions, its added creature comforts make for a more enjoyable journey out on the open ocean. The Greg Mortimer remains true to our ethos and focus on multiple landings, flexible itineraries and family atmosphere – just with an improved home base!

As a modern and custom-designed ship, the Greg Mortimer is at the cutting edge of nautical technology. Robust, powerful and built with our guests in mind, this ship marks a significant investment in our fleet's capabilities. From the European Arctic to the depths of Antarctica, and other far-flung destinations in-between, the Greg Mortimer will make your journey a breeze!

Greg Mortimer ULSTEIN X-BOW™

Our expeditions face some of the worst Mother Nature can throw at us. However, this won't be problem on the Greg Mortimer with the introduction of the patented X-BOW™, created by Norwegian ship designer ULSTEIN. As one of the leaders in marine engineering, ULSTEIN's X-BOW™ is an inverted bow concept that's been built on over 100 vessels in the shipping industry. Excitingly, we are the first expedition cruise operator to utilise this technology for the challenging open ocean waves! 

Hydraulic viewing platforms 

Although there is no doubt that you'll love the aesthetics of the Greg Mortimer, we are all here to admire the spectacular landscape and spot the elusive wildlife in their natural habitat. To ensure you get the best views possible, the new ship features unique viewing platforms, custom-built for the Greg Mortimer. Accessed from Deck 5, the two platforms fold out hydraulically for unobstructed views of passing marine life and seabirds – make sure your camera is locked and loaded!

Zodiac launching platform

Zodiacs are a vital part of getting up close and personal on your adventure – sneaking into areas that the Greg Mortimer can't reach. On this new ship, there are specially designed launching platforms that enables us to load Zodiacs easily and quickly, allowing you to spend more time exploring on the two to three daily landings. There are 15 Zodiacs that are boarded from either side of Deck 3 (sea level), perfect for when there is a group of fluffy cute penguin chicks that we need a photo of! 

Activity Platform

Regardless of your destination, we offer a number of additional activities to allow you to see more of the environment. From kayaking and diving to climbing and ski touring, it's these optional activities that often leave the biggest impression on your trip as a whole. Onboard the Greg Mortimer, there is a spacious prep and loading platform for these activities and more – designed in consultation with our expert activity guides.

Environmentally friendly

Climate change and carbon emissions continue to be major issues that everyone needs to be aware of and actively managing. This includes reduced emissions into the air and sea, lower energy consumption, high fuel efficiency, reduced light pollution for minimal wildlife disruption and lower on-board plastic use. It's vital to also mention the state-of-the-art virtual anchoring technology of the X-BOW™, which means the ship can float anchorless while launching Zodiacs, kayaks etc, without disturbing delicate sea floor areas. 

Safety features

This starts with the return-to-port equipment – not compulsory on a ship of this size – which duplicates the propulsion system. This enables the ship to maintain operating systems and comfort in the event of engine failure. Furthermore, the Greg Mortimer is Polar Code 6 compliant, holds BV class and is fully compliant with the latest SOLAS requirements. It's also built with a Rolls Royce stabiliser system.  If there's an incident or accident during your adventure, the ship has an on-board, fully-stocked medical centre – where our trained medical team can provide necessary treatment in a timely fashion. Safety continues to be an issue that our team takes very serious and the Greg Mortimer allows us to create an environment where you can concentrate on the brilliant landscape and wildlife, without worrying about your wellbeing.

Ship Life

Greg Mortimer is designed to serve your every need. It's your bedroom, bathroom, lounge, dining room and even your observatory. Make yourself at home, the Greg Mortimer is yours to enjoy!

Observation Points

Let's face it – you don't want windowless rooms when travelling around some of the most beautiful locations around the world. This is why the Greg Mortimer is designed with plenty of dedicated observation spaces – ideal for keen bird spotters, wildlife watchers and those wanting to watch the scenery go past. From the indoor 180-degree lounge and outdoor 360-degree open deck, both on deck 8, to the 270-degree open sundeck on level 7, there are plenty of observation points to share around the ship! If these are full, then you can take up a spot on one of the two hydraulic viewing platforms on deck 5. Aurora Expeditions also has an open bridge policy, which means at any point you can come up to the bridge and check out what the captain and officers are up to. From watching navigational practices to observing mapping techniques, you can get a firsthand look at the inner workings of the Greg Mortimer. 

Shore excursions

Although the ship is fun, the real enjoyment comes from the many shore excursions that are available. Depending on the weather and itinerary, it's possible to take two to three landings daily, taking a look at everything from rock formations and ancient ruins to cute groups of penguins. We know time is of the essence in these wild locations, so the Greg Mortimer has been designed with 15 Zodiacs, which means you can maximise your time on shore. From four dedicated sea level launching platforms, transfers are quicker, safer and enable you to get closer to the action for a longer period of time. Just remember to charge your camera before you step onto the Zodiac!

Activity options

From kayaking and skiing to diving and climbing, these are one-in-a-lifetime opportunities that you need to take advantage of.  Aboard the Greg Mortimer there is a specially designed launching platform for all activities, a concept overseen by our activity experts. This area also includes individual lockers in the expansive mudroom and rapid drying areas for wetsuits so you can quickly get warm after exploring in the elements!  

Dining

From the moment you step onto the Greg Mortimer, we aim to give you the best hospitality service possible. Starting with the official Captain's welcome, as our guests, you're welcome to 24 hours complimentary coffee, tea and snack facilities in addition to the range of different menu options and courses for each meal. Meals are served in large dining room/restaurant with family style dining, perfect to swap stories with your new expedition family. Enjoy the range of house wine, beers and soft drinks included with dinner after a long day in the wild, preparing yourself for another exciting day to follow. On the last day of your trip, the team on the Greg Mortimer put on a special farewell four-course dinner and cocktails – a perfect way to reflect on your time on the ship and consolidate lifelong friendships with the people you've met on-board.

On-board entertainment

When you’re relaxing during a sea day or you have a little downtime on the ship between excursions, what is there to do onboard the Greg Mortimer? Plenty! On all our expeditions, there are experts who lead presentations in the spacious lecture room so you can understand the region a little better. These often include topics as broad as history and culture to biology and climate change, these presentations aim to educate and entertain. If you're keen to just watch the surroundings and keep your eyes peeled for wildlife, you have access to two bars/lounges where the stunning floor to ceiling windows offer a special perspective on the landscape. The Greg Mortimer is also decked out with other facilities for your enjoyment. There is a library on Deck 5 with books and maps and a Wellness Centre complete with gym equipment, sauna and spa. Feeling a little sore after walking around all day? Treat yourself to a massage at the Wellness Centre and feels the aches disappear! Keen photographers and artists will revel in the multimedia room on Deck 5.

Cabin layout for Greg Mortimer

Sea Kayaking

Kayaking in the far-flung corners of the world is an experience guaranteed to refresh your soul. Paddling in small groups, you'll glide between ice floes, brash ice and icebergs dotted with wildlife.

Scuba Diving

The icy waters of Antarctic and the Arctic guarantee amazing new experiences.

Inclusions


• Accommodation in your chosen stateroom or suite
• All Zodiac excursions
• Shore excursions specified as included in the itinerary
• Entrance fees where applicable
• Experienced expedition team
• On board lectures held by expedition team
• All meals while on board
• House wines, beer and soft drinks included with dinner
• Captain’s Welcome and Farewell drinks including four-course dinner, house cocktail, house beer and wine, non-alcoholic beverages
• Rubber boots for use during the voyage
• Complimentary access to our onboard doctor for consultations relating to sea-sickness
• Comprehensive pre-departure material
• Personalised voyage photo book (post-voyage)
• Port fees/taxes

• Suite Benefits - Additional benefits for those who book Balcony, Junior and Captain's Suites:
• One free pair of binoculars per suite
• 1-hour spa treatment (Massage or facial only)
• Free stocked mini bar (Balcony and Junior suites stocked once, not replenished. Captains suite replenished as needed)
• Gratuities/tips for crew included - to the value of USD$15 per person per day~
• 1 free bottle of champagne per suite
• One night’s hotel accommodation with breakfast in San Jose on day 1
• Transfer from San Jose to Puerto Caldera on day 2
• One night’s hotel accommodation with breakfast in Cartagena de Indias on day 14
• Complimentary dry bag backpack to keep

Exclusions


• International or domestic airfares unless specified in the itinerary
• Pre and post voyage accommodation
• Transfers
• Beverages other than those listed in inclusions
• Gratuities
• Any items of a personal nature including medical costs incurred on board
• Passport and visa costs if applicable
• Travel insurance including mandatory medical evacuation cover

• GRATUITIES. A US$15.00 per person per day gratuity for the crew is automatically added to your onboard account. It is at your discretion if you would like to remove the tip (or increase/decrease the amount) when you settle your account. It is not necessary to tip the expedition team members.
Greg Mortimer
Central America ExpeditionExpedition
15 Days from
$14,295 AUD pp

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