Australia’s golden shores are well documented, but how well do you know the red ringed region of the Kimberley? This is the cruise to discover a taste of Oz as you’ve never seen before: the mesmerising technicolour life of the Great Barrier Reef, the rich Aboriginal culture of Mornington Island, the vestiges of life in Victoria Settlement. But surely the highlight of this voyage is a week in the Kimberley. From prolific wildlife to ancient rock to thundering waterfalls, there is nowhere else on earth quite like it.


Highlights


• Michaelmas Cay & Willis Islets

• Lizard Island

• Little Boydong Reef & Mornington Island

• Groote Eylandt & Yirrkala

• Elcho Island & Victoria Settlement

Warmly welcoming you to the natural wonders of the Great Barrier Reef, Cairns is a treasure trove of rich tropical beauty and incredible sea life. Swathes of rainforest spread out to the north, where you can soar over the canopy in a cable car, before looking down over narrow channels of water plummeting down gorges and crocodile-filled waterways. The diverse lands of the Atherton Tableland lie to the west, but it's the crystal-clear waters - and life-filled reefs - of Cairns' remarkable underwater world that draws universal adulation. Priding itself as the Gateway to the Great Barrier Reef, explore Cairns' constellation of colour, as you dive into the world's largest and most spectacular underwater universe. Cairns is huddled in amongst abundant swathes of rainforests, which give way to glorious crescents of golden beach. Kuranda - with its scenic railway and heritage market stalls - waits to be discovered, cloaked within the depths of the rainforest. Learn of the indigenous people of North Queensland during cultural performances, and hear the throaty reverberations of digeridoos, as you hear eternal stories handed down through time, from generation to generation. Back in Cairns, there's always time for a coffee or a beer, or a feast on fresh oysters with glasses of Cairns' white wines – boldly flavoured with mango and banana notes.
Michaelmas Cay, located on the western end of Michaelmas Reef, is part of the Michaelmas and Upolu Cays National Park and the larger UNESCO Word Heritage Great Barrier Reef. The 1.8ha cay is formed of the broken coral and shells which currents brought over and onto the reef and over time the cay has been covered partially with beach spinifex, stalky grass, sea purslane, beach morning glory and bulls head or puncture vine. Michaelmas Cay is considered one of the most important seabird breeding areas on the Great Barrier Reef with up to 20,000 pairs of seabird at the height of the season. As a result of the many seabirds the cay even had a guano mining lease in the early 20th century. Sooty Terns, Crested Terns, Lesser Crested Terns and Common Noddies nest all year round and another at least 12 species of seabirds have been recorded. Green sea turtles are seen occasionally and the reefs are an excellent area for snorkeling with visitors coming from Cairns, some 40 kilometers away.
Located beyond the Great Barrier Reef, some 450 kilometres east of Cairns, lie the little known Willis Islets. These three small islands are perhaps some of the least visited places on Earth. That is least visited by humans – the avian and marine population is tremendous. The Islets are home to millions of sea birds, turtles, crabs, eels, and are part of the Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve due to their unique ecological value. Access to land is provided only via boat under a government issued permit and is very, very limited. The cacophony of bird cries carries on day and night. Among regular inhabitants, birders will spy wedge-tailed shearwaters, sooty terns and common and black noddies. Several species of booby also migrate through the Island and, while not common, sightings of wood sandpipers, and sacred kingfishers and red-tailed tropicbirds have been recorded. The three islands - North Cay (the largest of the three Willis Islets), South Island (also referred to as Willis Island) and Middle Cay provide a safe nesting area for birds, turtles and other wildlife, thus visitors are requested to remain mindful of not disturbing the ecology of the islands. South Island is home to an Australian government weather monitoring station (established in 1921) which is manned year round by three meteorologists in six month shifts. The weather station was all but destroyed by Cyclone Yasi in 2011. The cyclone was so strong (cyclone force 5, with winds up to 185 km an hour) that it actually altered the topography and shape of the island’s coastline.
The Lizard Island National Park consists of six islands some 33 kilometers off Cape Flattery and 93 kilometers northeast of Cooktown, of which Lizard Island is the largest. This is the only continental group of islands found near the outer barrier reef and Lizard has a height of 359 meters. Acacia and eucalypt, grassland as well as mangroves contrast with sparkling blue waters and rich reefs surrounding the island. Watson’s Bay on Lizard Island’s northwestern side has a beautiful beach and easy access to snorkel areas, as well as the possibility to start on trails leading to the top of the island and Cooks Look or to Mangrove Beach on the south side for views of the lagoon and surrounding reefs. Before Captain Cook came on the Endeavour exploring Australia’s east coast in 1770 and stepping ashore on Lizard Island to gain a bird’s-eye view of the reefs, the Dingaal Aboriginal people had used the island for ceremonial purposes and to collect shellfish, while later European and Asian visitors were looking for sea cucumbers. The name of the island goes back to Captain Cook remarking on the amount of yellow-spotted monitors seen ashore. Slightly more than 100 species of birds have been recorded, for some of which the neighboring Seabird Islets, Osprey, South and Palfrey are important. There is an airstrip with the northernmost resort on the Great Barrier Reef at the northwestern end and a world-renowned tropical marine research station at the southwestern side.
The sandy shores of Little Boydong Reef and Island lie off the far reaches of the Cape York Peninsula, some 700 kilometres (440 miles) north-west of Cairns. Falling under the Denham Group National Park, this is as remote as the Great Barrier Reef gets. Little Boydong Reef offers prime snorkelling opportunities to the limited few who make it this far. Take the plunge and enjoy the cast of colourful reef life - the Great Barrier Reef boasts of 1625 (and counting) species of fish as well as 600 species of corals. So, there’s more than enough to see wherever you are! Make sure to keep an eye out for both green and hawksbill turtles too, as these fascinating reptiles use the beaches in the region for breeding. The nearby Milman and Aplin Islets are closed to visitors for this reason. Above the surface, the area’s birdlife is no less diverse. While walking the island one can enjoy looking for some of the 10 species of tern and 39 species of waders that frequent the shores and beaches. A multitude of other island species including the rather noble-looking Pied Imperial-pigeon, ruler of Little Boydong Reef, call this small slice of paradise home.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
28 kilometers off the coast of mainland Australia in the Gulf of Carpentaria, Mornington Island is the largest of the North Wellesley Islands. Twenty two islands make up the Mornington Shire Council with the only township, Gununa, on Mornington. The islands and surrounding seas have been traditionally used by the Lardil, Yangkaal, Kaiadilt and Gangalidda peoples before Matthew Flinders anchored the HMS Investigator off Sweers Island (South Wellesley) in 1802 and named several islands, including Mornington. All islands in the Wellesley groups were declared ‘Aboriginal Reserves’ in 1905 and a mission was eventually started on Mornington in 1914 when some 400 Lardil were believed to live on the island. Over the years Aboriginal groups from other neighboring islands were brought to live on Mornington. Although the mission originally tried to (re)educate and convert Aboriginal children and kept them in isolated dormitories, eventually the mission supported a cultural revival and the communities’ goal of self-management and recognition of Aboriginal land tenure. Today the Mornington Island dancers and the acclaimed artwork that has been produced in the last couple of years show the rich Aboriginal culture. The unique natural environment with swamp flats and windswept beaches with sea oaks and mangroves is also an important marine area for turtles, endangered dugongs and an abundant underwater marine life –it is considered one of the best fishing destinations in Australia. … Despite having opened the island, permission to visit must still be sought from Mornington Shire Council six weeks prior to any intended visit.
Anindilyakwa people were brought to Groote Eylandt on a series of song lines some eight thousand years ago according to Aboriginal history. Although the island and area had thereby long been used by Aborigines, Groote Eylandt was seen and received its current name in the early 17th century when Dutch explorers entered the Gulf of Carpentaria (named after the then Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies in 1623). It was Abel Tasman who in 1644 gave the quite indicative name of “Large Island”, not knowing that it was and is one of Australia’s largest islands. Groote Eylandt is part of the East Arnhem Region in the Northern Territories and has three townships. In 1921 the Church Missionary Society (CMS) started an Anglican mission at Emerald River which was moved northward in 1943 and is now known as Angurugu. Most clans living on the western side of the island had moved to Angurugu by 1950. On the northeastern side Umbakumba, a second indigenous community, was started in 1938. Additionally there are a number of family based outstations across the island. Today there are some 1,600 Anindilyakwa living on Groote Island. In the 1960s mining for manganese was permitted on the island, which now produces 10% of the world’s manganese supply. Many Aborigines have found work with the mine, but Alyangula, a third township north of Angurugu, was started primarily for the non-native mining company workers. The Groote Eylandt archipelago was declared an Indigenous Protected Area in 2006. Apart from the cultural importance of song lines and sacred sites, the marine environment supports unspoiled reef systems with abundant marine life. Considering the remoteness –and until recently limited access to the area- the Groote Eylandt archipelago possesses a unique ecosystem. The island shows extensive lateritic plains, rugged sandstone plateaus and hills in the central and southern part with large dune fields and sand plains in coastal areas, yet still has 4% of the Northern Territories rainforest. The area is considered of international importance for turtles and supports the densest nesting area of marine turtles in the Northern territory. One of the islets supports more than 1% of the world’s Roseate Terns.
Yirrkala is an aboriginal community in northeastern Arnhem Land and has a population of roughly 800 residents. The Yolngu have been in the area for more than 40,000 years, but they only congregated here in larger numbers when the township was founded after a Methodist mission was started in 1935. This small coastal settlement became famous in the 1960s as the Yolngu opposed the opening of a bauxite mine on their land, writing (and sending) the Yirrkala Bark Petition to the Australian House of Representatives. Yirrkala is also one of the best-known locations of Aboriginal art -not only in the Northern Territories- and has the community controlled Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Art Centre and Museum. Just 10 kilometers south of Yirrkala is Wurrwurrwuy, an interesting arrangement of stones listed on the Australian National Heritage List. The stones have been set up in the mid-19th century and depict praus, canoes, sea cucumber boiling spots and houses. The arrangement of praus even indicate the division onboard the vessels, showing an excellent knowledge of non-aboriginal items connected with the Macassan sea cucumber trade.
Elcho Island, known as Galiwinku by the indigenous Yolngu, is the largest of the Wessel Islands in Northeast Arnhem Land. The main settlement on the island’s southwestern side had started during WWII as a refuge from possible bombings of an air force base on nearby Milingimbi Island, some 70 km away. Banthula is one of the homelands on Elcho Island’s northwestern side facing the Arafura Sea. It was founded in 1979 when the Australian government encouraged the indigenous population to return to lands they had used before contact with the western world and to establish small settlements, the so-called homelands or outstations. Banthula is some 300 meters inland from Refuge Bay’s 7 kilometer long sandy shore. Some 40 Aborigines live in Banthula, almost 2% of Elcho Island’s population. The school closest to the Banthula children is some 12 km away at Gawa –it actually is one of Australia’s most remote schools. The area around Banthula has dry rain forest and an extensive mangrove growth is found around a creek at the northern end of the beach and bay. Green turtles, flatback turtles, hawksbill turtles, and Olive Ridley turtles, as well as dugong and Australian snubfin dolphins have all been recorded in and around Refuge Bay and Bridled Terns have been found nesting.
Nestled into the highly indented and rainforest-cloaked coastline of the Cobourg Peninsula, about as far north as you can go in the Northern Territory, lie the historic ruins of Victoria Settlement. At first glance the remains of weathered brick chimneys suggest a civilisation hewed out of the wilderness, but as the story unfolds, they become a monument to the folly of colonial expansion in a remote and unforgiving setting. The outpost was founded in 1838 to serve as a re-supply post for ships passing through the Torres Strait, and to strengthen British territorial claims. Now, as you walk around the various crumbling structures, it’s difficult not to appreciate the vibrant jungle enclosing the site, yet this same beautiful environment must have been viewed differently by the pioneers. The suffocating climate and fever gradually weakened and whittled down the population. Isolation and infrequent visits from ships eroded the spirits of the survivors. Unappealing to reinforcements, Victoria was abandoned after 11 years. The Cobourg Peninsula has since returned to its former glory under the alias Garig Gunak Barlu National Park. Its diverse wildlife list includes 6 species of marine turtle, dugong and wild banteng cattle (threatened in their native Indonesia). Even more notable is its recognition as an internationally important wetland habitat (under the Ramsar Convention). The park is administered jointly by the Parks and Wildlife Service and the traditional landowners, the Iwaidja speaking peoples.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Wyndham is a small settlement with the spirit of a Kimberley outback township. It was established in 1886 with the Halls Creek gold rush and sits on the Cambridge Gulf where several rivers converge. Today Wyndham has a population of roughly 900 people and operates largely as a port exporting cattle, servicing the mining industry and hosting a few small ships. For these vessels Wyndham is a gateway to the breathtaking Bungle Bungle mountain range and the nearby Ord River. The Bungle Bungle Mountains in Purnululu National Park are now a World Heritage Site. In excess of 350 million years have shaped geological formations of giant orange and black striped domes rising out of the ground into a landscape unlike any other. Known to the local Aboriginal people for thousands of years, the Bungles were only discovered by the outside world in the mid-1980s. Conversely, cruising the peaceful and tree-lined Ord River is a chance to look for freshwater crocodiles, fruit bats, short-eared rock wallabies and a variety of birds, including Mangrove Herons and Mangrove Gerygones. Please note: All destinations on voyages in the Kimberley region, and the order in which they are visited, are subject to tidal variations and weather conditions.
The King George Falls is one of the Kimberley’s most magnificent natural wonders. At 80 meters (260 feet), the thundering spectacle of twin cascades are among the highest in Australia. The river weaves through an amazing landscape of near vertical red rock formations and a parade of wildlife — carnivorous saltwater crocodiles and amazing birdlife, including giant raptors and the Brahminy Kite.
The Hunter River is home to an immense mangrove system surrounded by soaring red sandstone cliffs. Narrow mangrove channels shelter numerous bird species, mudskippers, fiddler crabs and the infamous saltwater crocodile; the most aggressive crocodile species known to man. Naturalist Island at the mouth of the river has a stunning stretch of sandy beach that makes a perfect landing site for small helicopters that can pick up visitors wishing to explore some of the Kimberley’s vast interior. The highlight inland is the famous Mitchell Falls where four tiers of waterfalls plunge into deep pools that flow out into the mighty Mitchell River. The headwaters of the falls are cool and a dip in the fresh water is a welcome reprieve from the heat of the heartland.
Set off the coast of Western Australia, the Buccaneer Archipelago is one of the Kimberley’s finest secrets. The Archipelago, 50 k2 (19 sq mi), is made up of around 800 islands and protect the mainland from the huge 12 metre tides and astonishing speed of the Yampi (or, in traditional Aborigine, “Yampee”) Sound. The speed and power of the water many not make for pleasant bathing, but do however result in fantastic natural phenomena. One fine example is the horizontal reversible waterfall in Talbot Bay. The tidal pull is responsible for the “reversible” nature of the falls, however, this also hides narrow gaps between the islands, making for treacherous sailing conditions. Isolated graves of sailors and divers are testimony to the danger. William Dampier sighted the Archipelago in 1688 but it would not be until 1821 that the Archipelago would become known as Buccaneer (a term coined by Captain Phillip Parker King) "in commemoration of William Dampier’s visit to this part of the coast ". Commander John Lort Stokes also noted the area in his 1838 record. Enterprising individuals were initially attracted to the Buccaneer Archipelago in the 1800s due to the superior pearling as well as the rich iron ore deposits. Pearling conducted by luggers in the 1880s was concentrated in Cygnet Bay, Cascade Bay, Cone Bay and Strickland Bay. More recently, mining operators established open-cut mines on Koolan Island on the east side of the Sound. Some of the richest iron ore in the world is extracted here to this day.
Set off the coast of Western Australia, the Buccaneer Archipelago is one of the Kimberley’s finest secrets. The Archipelago, 50 k2 (19 sq mi), is made up of around 800 islands and protect the mainland from the huge 12 metre tides and astonishing speed of the Yampi (or, in traditional Aborigine, “Yampee”) Sound. The speed and power of the water many not make for pleasant bathing, but do however result in fantastic natural phenomena. One fine example is the horizontal reversible waterfall in Talbot Bay. The tidal pull is responsible for the “reversible” nature of the falls, however, this also hides narrow gaps between the islands, making for treacherous sailing conditions. Isolated graves of sailors and divers are testimony to the danger. William Dampier sighted the Archipelago in 1688 but it would not be until 1821 that the Archipelago would become known as Buccaneer (a term coined by Captain Phillip Parker King) "in commemoration of William Dampier’s visit to this part of the coast ". Commander John Lort Stokes also noted the area in his 1838 record. Enterprising individuals were initially attracted to the Buccaneer Archipelago in the 1800s due to the superior pearling as well as the rich iron ore deposits. Pearling conducted by luggers in the 1880s was concentrated in Cygnet Bay, Cascade Bay, Cone Bay and Strickland Bay. More recently, mining operators established open-cut mines on Koolan Island on the east side of the Sound. Some of the richest iron ore in the world is extracted here to this day.
Gateway to the oldest and most elusive of all Australia’s nine regions, Broome is where your Kimberley adventure begins. The ancient landscape has long held travellers spellbound: The Kimberley is three time larger than England but has a population of just 35,000, is over 65,000 years old and is home to 2,000 km of coastline. Almost impenetrable, incredibly remote, the red baked earth, prolific wildlife, majestic canyons and swimming holes are the stuff of Australian wilderness dreams. English explorer William Dampier was the first explorer to set foot in Broome in 1668. However, the land had long been used as a trading route between east and west Kimberley for Aboriginal families. These semi-nomadic tribes respected strict unwritten rules regarding ownership of the land. The Yawuru people remain the Native Title holders for the township of Broome to this day. Broome itself has over 84 Aboriginal communities affiliated to it, 78 of which are considered remote. The city grew from its nascent pearling industry of the late 19th century. Pearl diving was dangerous in the waters surrounding Broome and for many years divers were limited to Aboriginal slaves, skin divers who faced cyclones, sharks, crocodiles, ear and chest infections in order to bring up as many pearl shells as possible for their masters. Natural pearls were rare and extremely valuable, and when found, were placed in a locked box. At the peak of its industry, around 1914, Broome was responsible for 80% of the world’s pearl trade.
Itineraries are subject to change.

Adventurer Suite. From

$15,100 USD pp
Adventurer Suite. From
Even guests who plan to spend only sleeping hours in their stateroom will appreciate the distinctive touches of this cosy Silversea accommodation. Dimensions: 157-167 sq ft / 14-15m2 with 2 portholes. All Adventurer Class staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Two portholes (15.75'' / 40cm in diameter). Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone

Explorer Suite. From

$15,900 USD pp
Explorer Suite. From
Deck Four forward is home to eight Explorer Class staterooms. Enjoy a separate sitting area and the passing scenery through a view window. Dimensions: 175-190 sq ft / 16-18m2 with view window. All Explorer Class staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. View window (31.5'' x 31.5'' / 80cm x 80cm). Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone

View Suite. From

$16,900 USD pp
View Suite. From
The perfect backdrop for breakfast in bed. As spacious as a Veranda Suite, but with a view window and Deck Three location. Dimensions: 192 sq ft / 18m2 with view window. All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. View window, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Triple capacity that can accommodate young children on sofa bed, (View Suites 310, 311, 312, 313), Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone

Vista Suite. From

$17,600 USD pp
Vista Suite. From
A quiet sanctuary. The sitting area has plenty of room to relax. Large picture windows frame panoramic ocean views. Some Vista Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 192 sq ft / 18m2 with large picture window. All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Large picture window: 47'' x 43'' / 120cm / 110cm, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone

Veranda Suite. From

$24,600 USD pp
Veranda Suite. From
A Silversea signature. Floor-to-ceiling glass doors open onto a private French balcony. Each spectacular sunset feels like it is yours alone. Dimensions: 206-216 sq ft / 19-20m2 including French balcony (16 sq ft / 1.5m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. French balcony with floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, (Suites 512 and 513 have a fixed queen bed), Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone

Medallion Suite. From

$29,000 USD pp
Medallion Suite. From
A mark of distinction. Sumptuous. Spacious. Rich textures surround you with distinguished luxury. The private veranda surrounds you with panoramic views. Dimensions: 400 sq ft / 37m2 including veranda (86 sq ft / 8m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table

Silver Suite. From

$30,600 USD pp
Silver Suite. From
Stylish and sophisticated. Spacious and welcoming. With separate dining and living rooms, two French balconies, and preferred midship location, Silver Suites are a favourite of returning Silversea guests. Silver Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 422 sq ft / 39m2 including 2 French balconies (30 sq ft / 3m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Two French balconies with floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room (with convertible sofa to accommodate an additional guest), Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table

Grand Suite. From

$33,800 USD pp
Grand Suite. From
Expertly designed and exquisitely appointed. At 618 square feet (57 square metres), the Grand Suite is ideal for entertaining friends or enjoying quiet time alone on your private veranda. Grand Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 618 sq ft / 57m2 including veranda (86 sq ft / 8m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room with sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Dry cleaning and pressing, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table, Four hours of Internet service per suite, per voyage segment, Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment

Owner's Suite. From

$37,000 USD pp
Owner's Suite. From
The name says it all. A stylish apartment. Prestigious and classic. For those whose standards are higher than most. Owner's Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 728 sq ft / 67m2 including large veranda (158 sq ft / 15m2), All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Large teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room with sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Dry cleaning and pressing, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table, Four hours of Internet service per suite, per voyage segment, Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment

Silver Explorer

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition

Length: 108 metres

Passenger Capacity: 144

Built / refurbished: 1989 / 2008 / 2018

Silversea’s purpose-built luxury Silver Explorer expedition cruise ship has been designed specifically for navigating waters in some of the world’s most remote destinations, including both of earth’s polar regions. A strengthened hull with a Lloyd’s Register ice-class notation (1A) for passenger vessels enables the Silver Explorer Expedition Cruise Ship to safely push through ice floes with ease. A fleet of 12 Zodiac boats allows Silversea Expedition guests to visit even the most off-the-beaten path locations and an expert Expedition Team provides insight and understanding to each unforgettable Silver Explorer luxury cruise adventure.


Cabin layout for Silver Explorer

Optional tours and excursions available. Please contact us for more details.

Inclusions


• Voyage on board in selected cabin category
• Butler service in every suite
• All meals on board*
• Beverages on board (Select wines, spirits and non-alcoholic beverages)
• Crew Gratuities (Excluding Spa & salon staff)
• Expedition excursions
• Lectures and entertainment on board
• Free wif-fi (Subject to coverage)
• Laundry service included for certain fare categories
• Self service laundry facilities available
• In country flights where required by the itinerary

*Some onboard restaurants incur an additional cost


Exclusions


• International flights unless otherwise stated
• Passport and visa costs if applicable
• Travel insurance
• Optional shore excursions
• Spa and Salon Treatments
• Complete valet services, including laundry, pressing and dry cleaning, are available at an additional charge
Silver Explorer
Australia Luxury ExpeditionLuxury Expedition
19 Days from
$15,100 USD pp

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